Padres acquire Carlos Quentin from the White Sox


Huh, and you probably thought New Years Eve day was going to be pretty boring for baseball news. Not so.

The Padres just announced that they have acquired outfielder Carlos Quentin from the White Sox for prospect right-hander Simon Castro and prospect left-hander Pedro Hernandez.

Quentin, a San Diego native, will be reunited with Josh Byrnes, who traded him to the White Sox for Chris Carter in December of 2007 when he was general manager of the Diamondbacks.

Quentin, 29, earned $5.05 million this season while batting .254/.340/.499 with 24 home runs, 77 RBI and an .838 OPS over 483 plate appearances. He is arbitration-eligible for the final time this winter. While he’ll give a boost to the punchless Padres’ lineup, he’s leaving behind the best ballpark for right-handed power for one that’s in the middle of the pack. He’s also a liability defensively in a pretty big outfield.

As for the White Sox, I guess we can say the rebuilding effort is back on. Castro, 23, was hyped as a top prospect in the Padres’ organization last winter, but posted a disappointing 5.63 ERA and 94/34 K/BB ratio over 115 innings this past season between Double-A San Antonio and Triple-A Tucson. Hernandez, 22, posted a 3.49 ERA and a quality 94/22 K/BB ratio over 116 innings in 2011 between High-A Lake Elsinore, Double-A San Antonio and Triple-A Tucson. For what it’s worth, Baseball America did not include either of them among the Padres’ top 10 prospects earlier this month. That being said, they should rank much higher in the depleted White Sox system. And with Quentin gone, Dayan Viciedo should finally get a chance to play everyday.

It’s sort of a head-scratcher for the Padres in that they aren’t expected to contend this season, but they had the excess pitching depth in the minors to make this deal without hurting them in the long-term. Of course, there’s always the chance they can use Quentin as a trade chip around the deadline.

Major League Baseball finds insufficient evidence to discipline Miguel Sano for sexual assualt

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In late December Betsy Bissen, a photographer for the Minnesota Twins website, Twins Daily, alleged that Miguel Sano assaulted her a few years ago. Bissen offered a detailed account of the incident.

In the account she said that in 2015 Sano was at an autograph signing at a store at which she volunteered. After the signing, she alleged that Sano grabbed her wrist and forced her to accompany him to a nearby store, attempted to force her through a doorway near the restrooms, tried to kiss her multiple times and continued to hold her, forcibly and painfully, by her wrist, in an effort to get her into the bathroom with him. She said the struggle lasted for 10 minutes, and her screams for help went unanswered.

Major League Baseball announced that it was investigating the matter. A few moments ago, it announced its findings and that it was declining to discipline Sano:

The Office of the Commissioner of Baseball has completed its investigation into an assault allegation made against Minnesota Twins third baseman Miguel Sano. The comprehensive investigation included interviews of more than 20 individuals, including Sano and the complainant, as well as a review of available documents, including communication records.

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Office of the Commissioner found that there was insufficient evidence to support a disciplinary determination against Sano, due to conflicting and inconsistent witness accounts and the absence of contemporaneous substantiation. Barring the receipt of any new information or evidence, the Office of the Commissioner will not impose discipline on Sano in connection with the alleged incident.

Based on the text of the statement, one may conclude that the league did not find Bissen’s claims to be credible.

This is first investigation of this type, or pursuant to its domestic violence policy under the umbrella of which this investigation presumably falls, which has not resulted in discipline of some kind. At least investigations of which the public was aware.