More details of Albert Pujols’ contract with the Angels

23 Comments

Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com reported yesterday that Albert Pujols’ 10-year contract with the Angels is extremely backloaded, including salaries of $12 million in 2012 and $16 million in 2013 and jumping to $30 million at its conclusion. Now Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com has some more details.

According to Heyman’s sources, Pujols is actually guaranteed $250 million from the Angels, not the $254 million sum that has been widely reported. This includes $10 million in “personal services” obligations to the Angels’ organization following his retirement, so he’ll be paid a total of $240 million from 2012-2021. It’s not clear whether the personal services contract will be counted toward the luxury tax.

Here’s the breakdown by year:

2012: $12 million
2013: $16 million
2014: $23 million
2015: $24 million
2016: $25 million
2017: $26 million
2018: $27 million
2019: $28 million
2020: $29 million
2021: $30 million

Per a report by Tim Brown of Yahoo! Sports earlier this month, Pujols will get an additional $3 million from the Angels if he reaches 3,000 hits and $7 million if he tops Barry Bonds’ all-time record of 762 career home runs. While Heyman has the deal potentially topping out at $260 million, Crasnick reported yesterday that he could earn $265 million with additional incentives.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”