So I guess I’m an “underwear guy”

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George Vecsey wrote for the New York Times for 43 years. He’s retiring now. Unlike some others of his generation, he pretty much kept his fastball until the end and even when I disagreed with him I thought he was a great writer who really understood the game and the context in which it existed.

He’d get cranky sometimes, but rarely if ever do I call him pulling the “back in my day” baloney some older columnists use to disparage younger players, and that is probably one of the harder things to do in that business, what with your memory and experience becoming more valuable as you progress in your career.

Sadly, however,  in an interview about his life and career over at The Morning Delivery blog, Vecsey decided to employ that approach to disparage new media:

Q. How optimistic are you for the future of the U.S. Newspaper Industry?

A: Not. Newspapers are the engines that drive the Web. Without editors planning assignments and copy editors fixing mistakes, reporters quickly deteriorate into Underwear Guys writing blogs from their den. The sad thing is that everybody knows it—even politicians and business people know they need some source of actual information, even if they get whacked once in a while. But the economics and timidity of the newspaper business are working against that future. And the bloggers brag about knowing how things work from the sanctity of their dens.

I’ll have Mr. Vecsey know that, while I happen to be writing from my den, I am not writing this in my underwear. I am wearing pajama pants, slippers and a San Francisco Seals shirt.  But hey, at least I’m not assumed to be in my mother’s basement anymore. Guess we Underwear Guys are moving up in the world.

More seriously, I defy Mr. Vecsey or anyone else who buys what he’s selling here to find any blogger worth a damn who thinks that real reporters doing real reporting are somehow obsolete.  Yes, the medium of actual printed newspapers may be dying, but the business of gathering and disseminating information is not. Even if it can be done from a den as opposed to a newsroom.

Oh well. Maybe someday “Underwear Guys” and similar smears will die out. Guess it won’t be today.

Sean Manaea pitches first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.