Shoulder surgery may keep Ryan Kalish out until June

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By trading Josh Reddick to the A’s yesterday the Red Sox seemingly cleared the way for Ryan Kalish to take over as their starting right fielder at some point in 2012, but whether he’s in the minors or majors Kalish will likely begin the season on the disabled list.

Kalish missed most of 2011 with injuries and had neck surgery in September, and now Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe reports that the 23-year-old outfielder also underwent left shoulder surgery to repair a torn labrum on November 8.

Kalish indicated that no official timetable has been established for his return yet, but Abraham speculates that he won’t be ready for game action until at least May and would presumably have to put together a good stretch at Triple-A before a call-up to Boston was an option.

He initially injured the shoulder while attempting to make a diving catch at Triple-A in April and later experienced neck problems related to the shoulder issues.

Boston acquired Ryan Sweeney as part of yesterday’s Andrew Bailey-for-Josh Reddick swap and starting him in right field versus right-handed pitching while finding a platoon partner to knock around left-handed pitching makes sense regardless of Kalish’s status.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.