Shoulder surgery may keep Ryan Kalish out until June

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By trading Josh Reddick to the A’s yesterday the Red Sox seemingly cleared the way for Ryan Kalish to take over as their starting right fielder at some point in 2012, but whether he’s in the minors or majors Kalish will likely begin the season on the disabled list.

Kalish missed most of 2011 with injuries and had neck surgery in September, and now Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe reports that the 23-year-old outfielder also underwent left shoulder surgery to repair a torn labrum on November 8.

Kalish indicated that no official timetable has been established for his return yet, but Abraham speculates that he won’t be ready for game action until at least May and would presumably have to put together a good stretch at Triple-A before a call-up to Boston was an option.

He initially injured the shoulder while attempting to make a diving catch at Triple-A in April and later experienced neck problems related to the shoulder issues.

Boston acquired Ryan Sweeney as part of yesterday’s Andrew Bailey-for-Josh Reddick swap and starting him in right field versus right-handed pitching while finding a platoon partner to knock around left-handed pitching makes sense regardless of Kalish’s status.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.