Billionaire hedge fund manager Steven Cohen is going to bid on the Dodgers

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If I had $8 billion to my name, you can pretty much assume that I’d be buying a baseball team. Don’t care which one, even. I’d buy one and hire all of my baseball man-crushes to run it and/or play for it and I’d sit in the owner’s box with the kind of women who like to hang out with octbillionaires while eating and drinking like I was a Roman emperor and there’s nothing you could do to stop me.

Connecticut-based hedge fund manager Steven Cohen has eight billion dollars. He may not have the same vision I have about how he’d behave as a baseball owner, but he certainly wants a baseball team. Or so says the L.A. Times. And he is serious about it:

Steven Cohen, a billionaire eight times over, is bidding for the Dodgers in a process tilted toward the high bidder. However, the East Coast hedge-fund executive is not content to let his wealth speak for itself. He has engaged one of America’s notable sports architecture firms to propose renovations to Dodger Stadium, allied himself with one of baseball’s power brokers, secured the support of at least two prominent Angelenos and met with several major league owners.

The power broker in question is agent Arn Tellem, who insiders think would run the Dodgers in some way, possibly as team president, if Cohen wins the auction for the team.

Cohen was last heard of in baseball circles back in April when he was said to be considering buying into the Mets. That never went anywhere, probably because guys with that kind of money and power typically don’t care to take a non-controlling interest in companies. Owning the Dodgers, however, is a different thing altogether.

Also a different thing: Cohen’s company, SAC Capital Advisors, has been in the news this year as a result of having two of its fund managers plead guilty to insider trading. Cohen has not been implicated, nor has the company as a whole, but there have been subpoenas and things and that kind of thing is always a mess.

It remains to be seen if that would cause Major League Baseball any headaches.  Though, as the article says, given that the Dodgers are being sold at auction, the league has a slightly smaller role to play in approving bidders than it normally would, with Frank McCourt having recourse to the bankruptcy court if he feels MLB is unreasonably withholding approval of a potential buyer.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.