Comment of the Day: my Jack Morris bias is revealed

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A reader took issue with my “I wouldn’t vote for Jack Morris” comment in the Vinny Castilla post:

Your B.S. about Morris not deserving the hall because he gave up so many runs during his wins & that his most wins in the 80’s is an over inflated stat during a meaningless time period is ludacris. Just admit it’s because he blanked your Braves for 10 innings in the W.S.

Yes. That’s it. You got me. It feels so good to be exposed like this. I no longer have to live a lie.  I no longer have to pretend that:

  • Morris didn’t prevent the opposition from scoring runs at anything much greater than an average clip;
  • That he didn’t “pitch to the score” (or, if he tried to, he was not particularly successful at it);
  • That apart from one game in the 1991 World Series, he was nothing special as a playoff pitcher;
  • That despite his “best starter of the 80s” reputation, he was rarely thought of as special by Cy Young voters, who gave him the same number of Cy Young votes over his career as Mike Hampton and Dontrelle Willis.

No, I can admit that Jack Morris was the best pitcher of his generation and most others and that my hatred of him is based on something he did 20 years ago that caused my team pain.  It’s the same reason I’m against Kent Hrbek and Dan Gladden for the Hall of Fame too.  My bias and hatred for any player who performs well against the Atlanta Braves is long and enduring and finally — finally! — it can be brought into the light.

God, this is such a weight off my shoulders.

Sean Manaea has a no-hitter through eight innings

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UPDATE (11:06 PM ET): Manaea is through eight innings of his no-hitter. He caught Rafael Devers looking, then induced a pop-up to retire Sandy Leon and whiffed Jackie Bradley Jr. to end the inning. He’s at 95 pitches and a career-high 10 strikeouts entering the ninth.

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea has no-hit the Red Sox through seven innings of Saturday’s game. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea held the Sox to just three total baserunners through the first seven innings.

Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning, collecting an infield hit for what appeared to be the Red Sox’ first hit of the evening. Upon further review, however, the hit was reversed after Benintendi incurred a batter interference call for running outside the baseline.

Manaea is currently working with a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth. He’s racked up eight strikeouts against 23 batters so far.

If Manaea sees the no-hitter through to completion — as seems entirely possible, given that his pitch count is resting at 84 entering the eighth — he’ll be the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter, meanwhile, was back in 1993 against the Mariners’ Chris Bosio.