Mets would need to be “knocked out” to trade Jon Niese

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There was an interesting report by Tracy Ringolsby of FOXSports.com yesterday that Mets’ left-hander Jon Niese was available in a trade centered around Rockies’ outfielder Seth Smith. It didn’t make a lot of sense on the Mets’ end, barring the inclusion of a third team, and it turns out there isn’t much to it.

According to Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com, the Mets have “zero interest” in parting with Niese in a deal involving Smith. What’s more, he hears they would have to be “knocked out” to trade him. I assume that doesn’t mean literally. MLB probably wouldn’t be happy about that.

Anyway, this seems to jibe with what Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com is hearing, specifically that Niese, Ike Davis, Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, Jenrry Mejia and Jeurys Familia are off-limits in trade talks for Athletics’ left-hander Gio Gonzalez. However, if that’s true, Gio Gonzalez probably won’t be a Met.

Niese has a 4.39 ERA over his first 370 2/3 innings in the majors, averaging 7.6 K/9 and 3.0 BB/9. The 25-year-old southpaw has traditionally underperformed relative to metrics like FIP and xFIP, mostly due to an usually high batting average on balls in play. He is arbitration-eligible for the first time next winter and under team control through 2015.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.