Hanley Ramirez still hesitant about move to third base

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The Marlins have repeatedly said that they have no intention to trade Hanley Ramirez following the addition of shortstop Jose Reyes, but it’s clear that he’s not yet on board with moving to third base.

Marlins president Larry Beinfest made some interesting comments to Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald yesterday, admitting that “it may take a little bit of time for him to get comfortable” with the idea of switching positions.

“The conversations we’ve had, we’re going to keep between us. But there’s been quite a bit of communication. He’s excited about playing for Ozzie Guillen. Ozzie is excited to have him. Everyone reacts to change differently.

“Even though we communicated with him and let him know what our intentions were in terms of Jose, he was the shortstop for six years, a very good one. We’ve asked him to move to third. Sometimes it just takes a little time for things to sink in. I think he recognizes we’re a better team with Jose.”

Another Marlins’ official told Jackson that they would like Ramirez to publicly endorse the signing of Reyes and a move to third base, but they haven’t pressured him to do so. The hope is that he’ll come around to the idea before spring training, but if the Marlins continue to face resistance, it stands to reason that they’ll explore the possibility of trading him.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.