Luke Scott

Tracking the non-tenders: Joe Saunders, Luke Scott, Hong-Chih Kuo

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Here’s the official list of players non-tendered prior to the Monday midnight deadline:

American League

Baltimore: OF/DH Luke Scott, LHP Jo-Jo Reyes, RHP Willie Eyre

Scott went from hitting .284/.368/.535 during an excellent 2010 season to .220/.301/.402 in 209 at-bats during a 2011 season shortened by shoulder surgery. The Orioles could re-sign him for significantly less than the $6 million he was due in arbitration. If not, he’ll enter the crowded free agent market as a lesser version of Jason Kubel.

Boston: LHP Rich Hill

Hill figures to miss at least the first month or two after Tommy John surgery, but since he did show promise as a sidewinding reliever last season, the Red Sox debated tendering him. They’ll make an attempt to re-sign him to a minor league contract.

Chicago: none

Cleveland: none

The Indians said they’ll tender everyone. Their only borderline arbitration-eligible player is third baseman Jack Hannahan, and he shouldn’t come in at much more than $1 million. Asdrubal Cabrera, Justin Masterson and Shin-Soo Choo are due for bigger raises, though Choo’s rough year will cost him.

Detroit: 2B Will Rhymes

Rhymes quickly fell out of favor after opening last season as Detroit’s primary second baseman. He has a nice career line of .283/.341/.370 in 276 major league at-bats, but if anyone had much interest in him, he would have been traded. He’s making the minimum, so that wasn’t an issue.

Kansas City: LHP Aaron Laffey

The Royals claimed Laffey off waivers from the Yankees in October, so it seems they want him around. Still, they weren’t interested in risking arbitration. A sinkerballing lefty, Laffey has a 4.34 ERA in 373 2/3 career innings. He may get a guaranteed deal from some team, but it will be for less than $1 million.

Los Angeles: none

The Angels said they’re tendering all of their arbitration-eligible players, a list that includes Kendrys Morales.

Minnesota: LHP Jose Mijares

Mijares should be a hot name with so little left-handed relief available this winter. He was terrible last season, with a 30/30 K/BB ratio and a 4.59 ERA in 49 innings, but he had an 83/32 K/BB ratio and a 2.67 ERA in 94 1/3 innings between 2009-10. Although he has a reputation as a bit of a head case, he’ll get guaranteed money.

New York: none

Yankees GM Brian Cashman confirmed that he would have no non-tenders tonight.

Oakland: none

Daric Barton, Landon Powell and Adam Rosales all agreed to one-year deals today, and the A’s announced that they’re tendering everyone. Powell and Rosales risked being non-tendered if they didn’t sign today.

Seattle: RHP Dan Cortes, C Chris Gimenez

Cortes’ inclusion is explained by the fact that he underwent a previously unrevealed shoulder surgery in October, leaving his status for the beginning of 2012 in doubt. The hard-throwing-but-wild right-hander could be re-signed to a minor league deal.

Tampa Bay: RHP Andy Sonnanstine

Sonnanstine was expendable regardless, but the trade for Burke Badenhop on Monday made it even more obvious he had no place in the Rays’ plans going forward. He might have a chance of surviving as a swingman in the NL.

Texas: RHP Fabio Castillo

Good arm, bad year in Double-A. The Rangers will probably re-sign him to a minor league deal.

Toronto: none

Jeff Mathis took a paycut and thus avoided being non-tendered. Dustin McGowan is another one who might have been non-tendered had he not agreed to a one-year deal on Monday.

National League

Arizona: LHP Joe Saunders, RHP Micah Owings

Confirmed now. FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal reported that Saunders would be a non-tender after failing to come to terms with the Diamondbacks on either a one- or two-year contract. He might be able to get a two-year deal from another team, possibly for $7 million-$8 million per year.

Atlanta: RHP Peter Moylan, INF Brooks Conrad

Moylan will miss at least the first month or two after rotator cuff surgery. The Braves will probably re-sign the veteran setup man to a lesser deal.

Chicago: C Koyie Hill

Here’s a move that’s long overdue. Hill is pretty atrocious offensively and isn’t really exceptional on defense either. Welington Castillo should prove to be an immediate upgrade behind Geovany Soto for the Cubs.

Cincinnati: none

John Fay reports that the Reds will tender everyone. Paul Janish and Jose Arredondo were the only arbitration-eligible players somewhat in doubt. The Reds have been looking for a veteran backup shortstop, suggesting that Janish’s place on the team is still far from assured.

Colorado: OF Ryan Spilborghs, OF Cole Garner

Spilborghs spent five years as a really nice part-timer for the Rockies before collapsing last year. He hit just .210/.283/.305 in 200 at-bats for Colorado. At 32, he has a chance to bounce back and serve as a productive bench player elsewhere. The Red Sox have often been mentioned in connection with him when his name has come up in trade rumors.

Florida: RHP Clay Hensley

The Marlins opted to keep Chris Volstad, which qualifies as a minor surprise. Hensley had already been designated for assignment, so this non-tender was a given. He washed out as a starter last season, but he did have a 3.51 ERA in 25 2/3 innings out of the pen. In 2010, he had a 2.16 ERA in 75 innings as a reliever.

Houston: none

The Astros had just two arbitration-eligible players in Humberto Quintero and J.A. Happ, and they’ve already re-signed Quintero.

Los Angeles: LHP Hong-Chih Kuo

Kuo’s case of the yips and likely $3 million salary was viewed as a bad combination by the Dodgers. There will be several teams interested if Los Angeles can’t re-sign him; when Kuo is on, he’s as unhittable as any lefty in the game.

Milwaukee: none

New York: OF Mike Baxter, C Ronny Paulino

Paulino seems to be wearing out his welcome with teams pretty quickly, but he still offers a nice bat versus left-handed pitching. It could get him a backup gig. The Mets are leaning towards going with light-hitting Mike Nickeas as Josh Thole’s backup, though that could change if Jason Varitek or Ivan Rodriguez is willing to sign for $1 million.

Philadelphia: none

Pittsburgh: C Jason Jaramillo, INF Pedro Ciriaco

Those two were already removed from the Pirates’ 40-man roster last week. Right-handers Jason Grilli and Chris Resop were the two veterans the Pirates considered non-tendering. Grilli saved his job by agreeing to a one-year deal today.

St. Louis: INF Ryan Theriot

Skip Schumaker took a two-year contract and avoided being non-tendered. Theriot will try to find a starting job at second base somewhere. His poor play at shortstop really limits his value as a utilityman.

San Diego: OF Jeremy Hermida

Hermida had already been designated for assignment. The Padres also re-signed outfielder Chris Denorfia to a one-year deal today. They’ll hold on to right-hander Dustin Moseley, who was considered a possible non-tender after surgery on his non-throwing shoulder.

San Francisco: 2B Jeff Keppinger, C Eli Whiteside

Mike Fontenot signed a one-year deal, so he escaped this fate. It helped his case that he’s a better shortstop than Keppinger. Keppinger can hit, though, and might get a look as a starter at second base.

Washington: LHP Doug Slaten

Slaten was limited to 31 appearances by an elbow injury last season, but he was a nice lefty specialist in 2010, when he had a 3.10 ERA in 40 2/3 innings. Mark Zuckerman says this will be the Nationals’ only non-tender, meaning Tom Gorzelanny will stick around as the second lefty in the Washington pen along with Sean Burnett. Jesus Flores was also offered a deal.

Fox asked Vin Scully to work the All-Star Game. Vin said no.

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Richard Dietsch of Sports Illustrated reports that Fox officials asked Vin Scully if he wanted to work the All-Star Game, be it calling the full game, doing an inning, making a guest appearance or whatever. Scully, though appreciative, said no thanks.

We’ve been over this, but for however much it might make people happy for Scully to make this kind of national appearance, there’s nothing in his history or in his apparent nature that would make such a thing appeal to Scully. For as much as an institution he has become, he still thinks of himself as an employee who calls Dodgers games, goes home and that is that. He has shown considerable discomfort, however politely he has communicated it, at being treated as something different or more special than that. And that’s before you remember that (a) it would be a totally different setup for him which would require a lot of extra work; and (b) the All-Star Break is a time when most baseball people take a couple of days off.

As I said the last time we discussed this, if baseball at large wants to give Scully some sort of national sendoff, the best bet would be for the powers that be to figure out how to get the final Dodgers games of the season nationally televised without blackout restrictions. That way we can all watch him doing his thing, in his element, for a final time without it being gimmicky.

Brad Ausmus’ rage hoodie sells for over $5,000

DETROIT, MI - MAY 16:  Manager Brad Ausmus #7 of the Detroit Tigers covers home plate with his jacket after being ejected for arguing when Nick Castellanos #9 of the Detroit Tigers was called out on strikes by home plate umpire Doug Eddings in the fourth inning of a game against the Minnesota Twins at Comerica Park on May 16, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)
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We wrote recently that the hoodie Brad Ausmus was wearing during his May 16th ejection from a Tigers game was up for auction. Ausmus removed the hoodie during his little rant and draped it over home plate, fomenting both an ejection and a suspension. For what it’s worth, the Tigers are 6-2 since the incident, so go Ausmus Rage.

Anyway, the auction for the hoodie has closed and a winning bid declared. The bid: $5,010. The proceeds will go to the Tiny Tigers t-ball program funded by the Detroit Tigers Foundation and the Detroit Police Athletic League.

Who says rage is a negative emotion?

David Wright: Matt Harvey made a mistake not talking to the media

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 19: Pitcher Matt Harvey #33 of the New York Mets walks off the mound after being relieved during the third inning of a game against the Washington Nationals at Citi Field on May 19, 2016 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
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The day after Matt Harvey left the clubhouse without talking to the media following yet another bad start, Mets captain David Wright spoke to the press about the whole affair.

Despite column, after column, after column after column in which Harvey was portrayed as a prima donna, was called names and otherwise had his character impugned for not talking to the press, Wright, amazingly, found a different tone to strike. Specifically, he managed to note that (a) it would have been better form and would have shown some accountability for Harvey to talk to the media; while (b) simultaneously acknowledging that Harvey is going through a bad time like most players go through and that it’s understandable that he’d make a mistake in this regard. Which Wright calls a “lapse” which he doesn’t think will happen again and about which Wright will likely talk to Harvey.

Most amazingly, Wright does all of this without calling Harvey names, saying he’s a phony or bringing up minor incidents from years ago in an effort to disingenuously cast Harvey not talking to the media as just the latest in a series of serious and escalating transgressions and/or failures of moral and ethical worth. How he did that I have no idea. Unlike the learned members of the sporting press, Wright didn’t even go to college. Maybe he’s mistaken to think this situation is somewhat complicated and emotional rather than one of stark right and wrong? Clearly, Wright must be mistaken. Life really is that simple, after all.

Or maybe Wright was simply able to appreciate that another person’s struggles are not about him. And that the healthy first impulse when someone who is struggling makes a mistake is to have at least a modicum of empathy and understanding rather than enter into a competition with one’s colleagues to see who can roast that struggling person the hardest.

But again, maybe that’s just crazy talk from a person who didn’t go to journalism school.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MAY 25: Brandon Crawford #35 of the San Francisco Giants is congratulated by George Kontos #70 and Matt Cain #18 after hitting a walk-off RBI single against the San Diego Padres during the tenth inning at AT&T Park on May 25, 2016 in San Francisco, California. The San Francisco Giants defeated the San Diego Padres 4-3 in 10 innings. (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)
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The lite version today, as I mourn the last day of school for my kids. Really, kids should go to school until mid-June. And then start school again in late June. School all year with no breaks except for, maybe, when the parents want a vacation. It would make the world run way, way better.

The Giants continued to roll on yesterday, winning in walkoff fashion with a Brandon Crawford RBI single in the 10th. They’ve won 13 of 14 games and now would be a good time to remind y’all that I picked them to win the World Series. The Yankees’ six-game winning streak was snapped thanks in part to a couple of homers from their old friend Russel Martin. A couple of streaks continued, hitting streaks that is, from Jackie Bradley Jr. and Xander Bogaerts with the former’s standing at 29 games and the latter at 18. The Braves fell to the Brewers in 13 innings, causing one to wonder what on Earth would make someone watch a 13-inning Braves-Brewers game if they weren’t being paid to.

Anyway, summer unofficially begins this weekend. If you’re like me and your kids will be hanging around constantly now, claiming they have nothing to do, summer begins at about 3pm today.

Here are the scores

Mets 2, Nationals 0
Phillies 8, Tigers 5
Twins 7, Royals 5
Cubs 9, Cardinals 8
Rangers 15, Angels 9
Indians 4, White Sox 3
Giants 4, Padres 3
Blue Jays 8, Yankees 4
Pirates 5, Diamondbacks 4
Red Sox 10, Rockies 3
Brewers 3, Braves 2
Marlins 4, Rays 3
Astros 4, Orioles 3
Mariners 13, Athletics 3
Dodgers 3, Reds 1