The Rays lock up Matt Moore for five years, $14 million with multiple team options

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Not counting the playoffs, Matt Moore has a grand total of three games and nine and one-third innings of major league experience. But as first reported by ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick, he is now locked up on a five-year, $14 million deal. That part of it takes him through arbitration. Marc Topkin adds that the Rays hold options for 2017-19, which could make this into an eight-year, $39.75 million deal over the 8 years

Say what you want about the uncertainty of pitching prospects, but this is an absolutely incredible bargain for the Rays. It makes the Evan Longoria deal — the current benchmark for a team-friendly deal — look like an overpay.  No, you can’t project a guy as young as Matt Moore to be the next Tim Lincecum, but look at the kind of money Lincecum made through his first five seasons — something like $27 million — and you can see what Moore is foregoing here.

And if Moore does fulfill his potential — even as a merely above average starter — the potential for the Rays to have him through age 30 at less than $40 million is a freakin’ steal.

Not that anyone can really blame him too harshly. Like I said: he has less than ten innings under his belt. He could blow out his arm tomorrow. Now, at age 22, his life is set up better than most people’s ever will be, even if it’s less-set-up than most ballplayers of his talent level typically are through the first five-eight years of their career.

In any case: solid move for the Rays. Just a fantastic business and baseball decision for them.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.