An updated look at what’s left in free agency

12 Comments

Here’s an up-to-date list of how the top 111 free agents have fared to date. Note that the list below doesn’t include Yu Darvish or Yoenis Cespedes, two of the remaining gems available to major league teams.

1. Albert Pujols (Cardinals): Angels – 10 years, $254 million
2. Prince Fielder (Brewers)
3. Jose Reyes (Mets): Marlins – 6 years, $106 million
4. C.J. Wilson (Rangers): Angels – 5 years, $77.5 million
5. Jimmy Rollins (Phillies)
6. Jonathan Papelbon (Red Sox): Phillies – 4 years, $50 million
7. Mark Buehrle (White Sox): Marlins – 4 years, $58 million
8. Carlos Beltran (Giants)
9. Edwin Jackson (Cardinals)
10. Aramis Ramirez (Cubs)
11. David Ortiz (Red Sox): Red Sox – accepted arbitration
12. Heath Bell (Padres): Marlins – 3 years, $27 million
13. Michael Cuddyer (Twins)
14. Ryan Madson (Phillies)
15. Hiroki Kuroda (Dodgers)
16. Francisco Rodriguez (Brewers): Brewers – accepted arbitration
17. Josh Willingham (Athletics)
18. Roy Oswalt (Phillies)
19. Jason Kubel (Twins)
20. Javier Vazquez (Marlins)
21. Paul Maholm (Pirates)
22. Kelly Johnson (Blue Jays): Blue Jays – accepted arbitration
23. Hisashi Iwakuma (Japan)
24. Francisco Cordero (Reds)
25. Grady Sizemore (Indians): Indians – 1 year, $5 million
26. Erik Bedard (Red Sox): Pirates – 1 year, $4.5 million
27. Carlos Pena (Cubs)
28. Tsuyoshi Wada (Japan)
29. Coco Crisp (Athletics)
30. Casey Kotchman (Rays)
31. David DeJesus (Athletics): Cubs – 2 years, $10 million
32. Rafael Furcal (Cardinals)
33. Derrek Lee (Pirates)
34. Joel Pineiro (Angels)
35. Clint Barmes (Astros): Pirates – 2 years, $10.5 million
36. Jason Marquis (D-backs)
37. Aaron Hill (D-backs): D-backs – 2 years, $11 million
38. Johnny Damon (Rays)
39. Bruce Chen (Royals): Royals – 2 years, $9 million
40. Joe Nathan (Twins): Rangers – 2 years, $14.75 million
41. Bartolo Colon (Yankees)
42. Vladimir Guerrero (Orioles)
43. Cody Ross (Giants)
44. Aaron Harang (Padres): Dodgers – 2 years, $12 million
45. Jonathan Broxton (Dodgers): Royals – 1 year, $4.5 million
46. Ryan Ludwick (Pirates)
47. Matt Capps (Twins): Twins – 1 year, $4.75 million
48. Ramon Hernandez (Reds): Rockies – 2 years, $6.4 million
49. Mark Ellis (Rockies): Dodgers – 2 years, $8.75 million
50. Freddy Garcia (Yankees): Yankees – 1 year, $4 million
51. Wilson Betemit (Tigers)
52. Darren Oliver (Rangers)
53. Frank Francisco (Blue Jays): Mets – 2 years, $12 million
54. Juan Rivera (Dodgers): Dodgers – 1 year, $4.5 million
55. Chris Capuano (Mets): Dodgers – 2 years, $10 million
56. Hideki Matsui (Athletics)
57. Brad Lidge (Phillies)
58. J.D. Drew (Red Sox)
59. Ramon Santiago (Tigers): Tigers – 2 years, $4 million
60. Juan Pierre (White Sox)
61. Chien-Ming Wang (Nationals): Nationals – 1 year, $4 million
62. Alex Gonzalez (Braves): Brewers
63. Ryan Doumit (Pirates): Twins – 1 year, $3 million
64. Jim Thome (Indians): Phillies – 1 year, $1.25 million
65. Kerry Wood (Cubs)
66. Rich Harden (Athletics)
67. Casey Blake (Dodgers)
68. Octavio Dotel (Cardinals): Tigers – 1 year, $3.5 million
69. Magglio Ordonez (Tigers)
70. Jon Garland (Dodgers)
71. Yuniesky Betancourt (Brewers)
72. Kosuke Fukudome (Indians)
73. Jamey Carroll (Dodgers): Twins – 2 years, $6.75 million
74. Brad Penny (Tigers)
75. LaTroy Hawkins (Brewers): Angels – 1 year, $3 million
76. Rod Barajas (Dodgers): Pirates – 1 year, $4 million
77. Chad Qualls (Padres)
78. Jeff Francis (Royals)
79. Raul Ibanez (Phillies)
80. Jon Rauch (Blue Jays): Mets – 1 year, $3.5 million
81. Chris Snyder (Pirates)
82. Jonny Gomes (Nationals)
83. Takashi Saito (Brewers)
84. Jorge Posada (Yankees)
85. Mike Gonzalez (Rangers)
86. Laynce Nix (Nationals): Phillies – 2 years, $2.5 million
87. Nate McLouth (Braves): Pirates – 1 year, $1.5 million
88. Livan Hernandez (Nationals)
89. Michael Wuertz (Athletics)
90. Jason Varitek (Red Sox)
91. Jerry Hairston Jr. (Brewers): Dodgers – 2 years, $6 million
92. Andruw Jones (Yankees)
93. Fernando Rodney (Angels)
94. Jason Isringhausen (Mets)
95. Willie Bloomquist (D-backs): D-backs – 2 years, $3.8 million
96. Scott Hairston (Mets)
97. Kevin Millwood (Rockies)
98. Todd Coffey (Nationals)
99. Kelly Shoppach (Rays)
100. Ben Sheets (N/A)
101. Ronny Cedeno (Pirates)
102. Lyle Overbay (D-backs): D-backs – 1 year, $1 million
103. Juan Cruz (Rays)
104. Aaron Cook (Rockies)
105. Reed Johnson (Cubs)
106. Guillermo Mota (Giants)
107. Ivan Rodriguez (Nationals)
108. Zach Duke (D-backs)
109. Dan Wheeler (Red Sox)
110. Mark DeRosa (Giants)
111. Chris Young (Mets)

Max Scherzer will not be ready for Opening Day

Getty Images
1 Comment

Ten days ago Nationals ace Max Scherzer said he’d be ready for the start of the regular season. “I’m gonna do it,” Scherzer said.

[Ron Howard from “Arrested Development” voice] — No, he’s not:

Nationals manager Dusty Baker said that Max Scherzer is not on track to be the team’s opening day starter, and will most likely open the season as the third pitcher in the rotation.

He’s still projected to make it to the opening rotation, taking the hill, most likely, on Thursday April 6 against the Marlins. At least if the schedule doesn’t slip any more.

Scherzer, as you probably know, has a stress fracture in the knuckle of his right ring finger, which has messed with his preparation and has caused him to alter his grip a bit. As of now Stephen Strasburg will get the Opening Day nod.

Theo Epstein named The World’s Greatest Leader

Getty Images
11 Comments

Fortune Magazine has put out a list of The World’s Greatest Leaders. Not the greatest business leaders, not the greatest leaders in a given industry, but the Greatest Leaders, full stop. The greatest according to Fortune: The Cubs’ Theo Epstein.

For some context, Pope Francis was third. Angela Merkel was 10th. Lebron James was the next greatest sports leader, ranked 11th. Take Fortune’s methodology with a grain of salt, however, given that it has John McCain above Merkel — what, exactly, does he lead now? — and Samantha Bee in the top 20.

So what makes Theo the world’s best leader according to Fortune?

The Cubs owe their success to a five-year rebuilding program that featured a concatenation of different leadership styles. The team thrived under the affable patience of owner Tom Ricketts, and, later, under the innovative eccentricity of manager Joe Maddon. But most important of all was the evolution of the club’s president for baseball operations, Theo Epstein, the wunderkind executive who realized he would need to grow as a leader in order to replicate in Chicago the success he’d had with the Boston Red Sox.

I don’t want to take anything away from what Theo has done — he’s a Hall of Fame executive already in my view — but I feel like maybe one needs to adjust for the fact that this is a baseball team we’re talking about. They’re the whole world to us and their brands are nationally and even world famous, but as an organization, sports teams are rather small. There are guys who run reasonably-sized HVAC companies with more employees than a baseball team and they don’t get the benefit of an antitrust exemption and a rule which allows them to get their pick of the best new employees if they had a bad year the year before.

Really, not trying to throw shade here, just thinking that being the spiritual father for 1.2 billion Catholics or running a foundation that serves 55 million needy children — like the woman who comes in at number 14 — is a bit of a tougher trick.

But this will make a great framed magazine article on Theo’s wall in Wrigley Field.