Albert Pujols and how the best players ever through age 31 performed from age 32 on


Perhaps the only thing everyone can agree on when it comes to Albert Pujols leaving St. Louis for the Angels and $250 million is that his Cardinals career was amazing.

Pujols debuted on April 2, 2001 after surprisingly making the team out of spring training as a 21-year-old with just three games of experience above Single-A and performed at an MVP-level for 11 straight seasons.

Based on’s Wins Above Replacement calculations Pujols was worth 89.1 more wins than a replacement-level first baseman in 11 seasons with the Cardinals, which is the seventh-highest WAR total in baseball history through age 31:

Ty Cobb           112.5
Mickey Mantle     101.1
Rogers Hornsby    100.9
Babe Ruth          96.8
Hank Aaron         90.2
Alex Rodriguez    89.7
Lou Gehrig         86.9
Willie Mays        86.9
Mel Ott            86.8

Obviously that’s some ridiculously amazing company, but seeing Pujols on that list did make me curious about how those other guys fared after age 31. Here are the Wins Above Replacement totals for those same players from age 32 on:

Babe Ruth          75.2
Willie Mays        67.8
Hank Aaron         51.4
Ty Cobb            46.9
Lou Gehrig         31.5
Rogers Hornsby     26.9
Mel Ott            22.5
Mickey Mantle      19.1
Alex Rodriguez     15.2

It’s tough to find too much meaning in those numbers given that most of those careers finished decades ago–and the one recent player, Alex Rodriguez, is still adding to his total–but clearly the odds are stacked against Pujols being worth anywhere near as much from age 32 on as he was from 21-31. In fact, the highest WAR total in MLB history after age 31 belongs to Barry Bonds at 86.5 and even that’s lower than Pujols’ mark through age 31.

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

Getty Images
Leave a comment

While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”