Greetings from Day 3 of the Winter Meetings

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In-N-Out in Dallas?  Who knew?  Baseball writers, that’s who. You could put them on an island in some far flung sea and they’d be able to find an In-N-Out Burger.  It’s just what they do.

I felt obligated to go anyway. The lobby was getting to be too much for me last night.  The first 200 conversations that began with “so, who do you think the Mystery Team is?” were endurable but it got slightly less so as the evening wore on. Sometimes you just need a cheeseburger in that situation.

Not that anyone could or should think that Pujols talk was avoidable. He has dominated the first two days of the Winter Meetings, for obvious reasons. He’s huge. No one else is doing anything. And oh my God, the Marlins.

Maybe the Marlins with some hubris, too: they spread the word yesterday that they wanted a decision from Pujols last night. Well, it’s 7AM here and he’s still a free agent. As if they were going to pull their offer because of an arbitrary deadline.  It’s like they’re trying to steal someone’s wife and are forcing her to run off with them tonight lest she think too hard about what she’s doing and change her mind. Albert will decide on Albert’s time.

Otherwise, in the event that, unlike me, you went to bed at a decent hour, wake up this morning to the knowledge that the Tigers are interested in Gio Gonzalez, though the A’s are apparently asking a mint.  The Mariners are maintaining their pursuit of Prince Fielder. The Mets paid what seems like way too damn much money for Frank Francisco.  Sandy Alderson seemed like a guy who understood supply and demand, but I suppose not. He isn’t the first GM to go reliever crazy this winter.

Pujols has to sign today, right? I mean, he can’t keep teasing us all like this, can he?  Either way, we’ll be on the case again. Keep HBT up all day. Your boss will understand. This is serious business.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: