UPDATE: The Reds may not be a match for Jurrjens

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UPDATE: Or not. Mark Sheldon of MLB.com hears that the Reds do not appear to be seriously pursuing Jurrjens. Another issue is that the two sides don’t match up well for a deal. The Braves are said to be looking for a power-hitting outfielder in return while the Reds best trade chips — Yonder Alonso and Juan Francisco — don’t exactly fit the bill.

7:40 PM: Jon Heyman of SI.com reports that the Reds are “very interested” in a potential deal for Braves right-hander Jair Jurrjens.

It’s not clear who the Braves would ask for in return, but they are in the process of gauging interest in an effort to clear salary to upgrade their lineup. As you may recall, Jurrjens was floated in a potential deal with the Royals last month.

Jurrjens earned $3.25 million in 2011 while posting a 2.96 ERA and 90/44 K/BB ratio over 152 innings. His salary could rise north of $5 million in his second year of arbitration.

While Heyman notes that 10 teams have expressed interest in Jurrjens, the potential return could be impacted by concerns about his troublesome right knee. The 25-year-old right-hander had arthroscopic surgery on the knee last October and was limited to just seven starts after the All-Star break this season due to a bone bruise.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.