Free agent Cody Ross seeks three-year deal


An NL official told ESPN’s Buster Olney that free agent Cody Ross is currently seeking a three-year deal.

The 31-year-old Ross was a disappointment for the Giants last season, finishing at .240/.325/.405 with 14 homers and 52 RBI in 405 at-bats. He’d seem to fall in line behind Michael Cuddyer and Josh Willingham among free agent outfielders, and neither of those two is a lock to get a three-year deal.

What Ross does have going for him is that he’s an above average defender in a corner and an adequate center fielder. However, since he finished at .804 in his first year of regular playing time with the Marlins in 2008, his OPS has dipped each season. He ended up at .790 in 2009, .735 in 2010 and .730 in 2011. Also, the bulk of his production comes against left-handers: he’s hit .282/.349/.563 versus southpaws in his career, compared to .253/.313/.414 against righties.

The total package makes Ross a fringe regular, though he’d be an outstanding fourth outfielder as a starter against lefties and an occasional fill-in against righties. Had he entered free agency a year ago, there’s a chance he might have gotten that three-year deal. Coming off a mediocre 2011, he’ll be fortunate if someone antes up $10 million for two years.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.