Who will be the mystery team for Jose Reyes?

7 Comments

It’s hard to imagine Jose Reyes joining the Marlins for a relatively light $90 million over six years. Jon Heyman’s proposed $80 million over five years deal from the Mets isn’t all that special either. So, who might yet get involved in the bidding for the shortstop?

Red Sox – Boston may not have as much financial flexibility this year as last, but if new GM Ben Cherington is willing to go with Daniel Bard in the closer’s role, then fitting Reyes into the budget would seem possible. The switch-hitting Reyes would be a terrific fit in between Jacoby Ellsbury and Adrian Gonzalez at the top of the order, and the Red Sox wouldn’t have much problem covering for his injuries with either Marco Scutaro or Jed Lowrie around as a backup (the other would likely be involved in a deal).

Giants – GM Brian Sabean decided to build what will probably be the game’s most expensive bullpen, so it doesn’t look like there’s room for Reyes without the team’s payroll hitting $140 million next year. He’d provide a huge lift at a problem position, though, and give the Giants the leadoff hitter they need.

Tigers – Reyes would be an upgrade over Austin Jackson in the leadoff spot and he’d improve the defense by pushing Jhonny Peralta back to third base, but the Tigers are more interested in adding pitching.

Phillies – There’s little to suggest the Phillies would really consider spurning Jimmy Rollins for a younger but more expensive player.

Angels – It looks like the Angels would prefer to add power, but the idea of signing Reyes and then cashing in Erick Aybar is rather attractive. The Angels got OBPs of .325 and .316 from the top two spots in the order last season.

Nationals – The money is there, but the Nationals probably aren’t going to want to spend it on such an injury-prone player.

Brewers – If the Brewers thought they could get Reyes for $90 million over six years, I think they’d be all over it. The price, though, is likely to be higher than that, and the Brewers aren’t going to want to commit to anything until they’ve ruled out re-signing Prince Fielder.

Cardinals – St. Louis is sort of in the same boat. If Albert Pujols departs, then maybe Reyes would be an option. Reyes, though, may be long gone by the time Pujols makes up his mind. The Brewers are a more likely suitor anyway.

I do believe that one team from this bunch will end up making a big run at Reyes, forcing the Marlins to up their bid if they expect to stay in the running. I’d put Boston first on the list, followed by Detroit.

Dodgers, Cubs could be interested in Justin Verlander

3 Comments

Jon Morosi of MLB Network said yesterday that the Detroit Tigers and Chicago Cubs have been engaged in trade talks involving starting pitcher Justin Verlander and catcher Alex Avila. Morosi also noted that the Los Angeles Dodgers have shown interest in Verlander as well. Whether this is idyl chitchatting of serious dispute is unclear, of course. Everything is unclear in the leadup to the deadline.

The veteran right-hander is carrying a 4.50 with a 120/57 K/BB ratio over 124 innings. Verlander impressed last year, finishing second in AL Cy Young Award balloting, but he has fallen back to Earth in 2017. His velocity remains high, however, and it’s not hard to imagine him going on a solid run in a way that could help a contender. He is owed $56 million over the next two seasons, however, and has a $22 million option that could vest for 2020, so negotiations for him could be tough. If the Tigers want talent back, they’ll have to eat salary.

Verlander got an ovation from a Detroit crowd last night which seemed to sense that, yes, it’s possible he pitched his last game for the Tigers. Given that he has 10/5 rights, allowing him to veto any trade, that decision is ultimately up to him. It’s not hard to imagine him accepting a trade to a contender, however.

We wait see.

A 30-year-old rookie won his major league debut

2 Comments

The Dodgers beat the Twins last night thanks to a Cody Bellinger three-run homer. But Bellinger was not the only Dodgers rookie who had a notable game. A far more unconventional one is worth mentioning as well.

That rookie is reliever Edward Paredes, who made his big league debut last night. What makes him unconventional: he’s 30. Turns 31 in September, actually. Paredes pitched professionally for 12 years before making it to The Show. Most of that time was in the affiliated minors in the Mariners, Indians, Angels and Dodgers organizations. He spent time in the independent Atlantic League in 2013-15 as well.

Paredes did not do anything heroic last night. It was more of a right place/right time kind of appearance, retiring the side in order with a fly out, line out and a ground out and remaining the pitcher of record while Bellinger hit that three-run homer. That’s enough for a W, though. A W that Paredes waited a lot longer for than most pitchers who notch one in the bigs.