UPDATE: Pirates haven’t entertained offers for Andrew McCutchen

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UPDATE: That was fun while it lasted. According to Dejan Kovacevic of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, a high-ranking team official said the Pirates have not entertained trade offers for McCutchen and have no intention of doing so.

6:50 PM: Andrew McCutchen, who made his first All-Star team before slipping in the second half of last season, is potentially available in trade talks, a source told ESPN’s Keith Law.

McCutchen just turned 25 in October and is four years away from free agency, so there’s certainly no pressure for the Pirates to move him now. It should also be noted that Law’s report doesn’t indicate that the Pirates are shopping him, just that they’d listen to offers.

Even that idea, though, would have seemed far fetched a few months ago. One factor influencing the Pirates here is that they’ve tried and failed a couple of times to lock up McCutchen to a long-term deal. Also, McCutchen’s overall lack of growth since he entered the league is somewhat disturbing. While McCutchen has added power, he’s no better of a player now than he was in a rookie. His strikeout rate took a big jump last season (from 89 strikeouts in 653 plate appearances in 2010 to 126 in 678 plate appearances), and he hasn’t proven to be much better than an average defensive center fielder.

It’s still doubtful the Pirates would trade him, but if someone is willing to make a big offer, they might bite. Washington would seem like an obvious candidate there. If the Nationals would start with right-hander Jordan Zimmermann and add a couple of prospects, that’d be a pretty attractive proposal.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.