Bruce Chen

Bruce Chen gets $9 million over two years from Royals


After 13 seasons and 10 teams, left-hander Bruce Chen has himself a multiyear contract. The Royals re-signed him to a two-year, $9 million deal on Wednesday,’s Jon Heyman reports.

There’s never been a journeyman quite like Chen. 34 others have also played for 10 different franchises, but Chen pulled it off in just 11 seasons before finding a home in Kansas City. This next year will be his fourth with the Royals, and after a rocky start with the team in 2009, he’s gone 24-15 with a 3.96 ERA the last two years.

Chen broke in with the Braves very young, so he’s still just 34 now. Doomed by a proclivity for giving him homers in his early years, he’s benefited tremendously from the game’s falling power numbers. It also helps that he’s gotten to play in an underrated pitcher’s park in Kansas City recently.

There is a big cause for concern here, though. Chen fanned just 5.6 batters per nine innings last season, down from 6.3 in 2010. His career rate is 6.8. Chen’s a different pitcher now than he used to be, one who doesn’t need to get so many outs via the K. Still, it’s hardly a good sign that he took such a big dip. His walk rate is falling as well, which is a big reason the loss of strikeouts didn’t hurt him last season. It’s just that a tumbling strikeout rate is one of the worst indicators when it comes to predicting future success.

The Royals are simply hoping for more of the same from Chen. It’s doubtful that he’ll ever start a postseason game for the team, but they’re banking on him serving as a solid middle-of-the-r0tation guy for a while longer.

And chalk one up for perseverence here. It’s a wonder than Chen never gave up while bouncing from team-to-team. From 2000-03, he played for multiple clubs each season. In 2006, he went 0-7 with a 6.93 ERA. In 2007, the Rangers sent him down after just five appearances and never brought him back. It was two years before he’d again see the majors. But now he’ll make nearly as much these next two seasons as he has the rest of his career combined.

Jason Kipnis injured his ankle celebrating the pennant with Francisco Lindor

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Jose Ramirez #11, Francisco Lindor #12, Jason Kipnis #22 and Mike Napoli #26 of the Cleveland Indians celebrate after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays with a score of 4 to 2 in game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis tweeted on Sunday, “Got a little too close to [Francisco Lindor] during the celebration!! Freak accident but should be good to go by Tuesday! #cantkeepmeoutofthisgame!”

Per’s Jordan Bastian, manager Terry Francona said Kipnis is dealing with a low ankle sprain, but he’s expected to be ready to go when the World Series begins on Tuesday. Kipnis went through fielding drills on Sunday.

Kipnis is hitting .167/.219/.367 with a pair of homers and four RBI in eight games this postseason.

Terry Francona sets Indians’ World Series rotation for first three games

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 18:  Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians throws a pitch in the first inning against the Toronto Blue Jays during game four of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 18, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that Indians manager Terry Francona has set his starting rotation for the first three games of the World Series against the Cubs. Corey Kluber will start Game One, followed by Trevor Bauer and Josh Tomlin for Games Two and Three, respectively.

Kluber, the ace of the staff, has had a terrific postseason. He’s made three starts with a 0.98 ERA and a 20/7 K/BB ratio in 18 1/3 innings. The Indians won two of his starts — Game Two of the ALDS and Game 1 of the ALCS.

Bauer was unable to make it out of the first inning of his ALCS Game 3 start against the Blue Jays after the stitches on his pinky opened up and caused blood to pour out. He suffered the injury repairing one of his drones, which he builds as a hobby. Bauer insists he’ll be good to go in Game Two, though he also insisted that the injury wouldn’t be an impediment against the Jays.

Tomlin has made two solid starts for the Indians, allowing a total of three runs over 10 2/3 innings. The Indians won both games he started, Game 3 of the ALDS and Game 2 of the ALCS.’s Jordan Bastian notes that if Bauer can’t go in Game Two, Tomlin will be moved up to start in his place.