The new HGH testing will be kind of weird

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The announcement that the new collective bargaining agreement provides for testing for HGH was a bit surprising, but the way it’s being implemented is kind of surprising too.  Here’s a mashup of Buster Olney’s tweets in the past few minutes reporting on that:

On HGH testing: It’s TBD when/if it goes into effect. There will be a test of HGH testing in the upcoming spring training … Players will be blood tested this spring, to determine energy levels after testing; results of testing will be discarded … Then, after results of physical reaction to blood testing is determined, the two sides will determine when and how to proceed … The blood samples taken next spring training can be tested for HGH; the first offseason testing will start next winter, 2012-2013.

There’s a lot of prudence there. When the topic of blood testing was first mentioned several years ago there was concern that players giving blood would be detrimental to their conditioning and energy-levels. This phase-in/testing regime seems to address that.

But I do love the idea of these baseline blood tests being “discarded.”  The last time that was promised for baseball drug testing a bunch of over-zealous feds seized all of the results, started prosecuting people and years of litigation ensured.  Here’s hoping there’s a “must-destroy” date inserted in the final paperwork.

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.