DWI policy, maple bats, new helmets all part of the new collective bargaining agreement

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More health and safety stuff from the new collective bargaining agreement.  First, let’s call this new part the “2011 DUI-fest Memorial Contract Provision”:

The parties agreed on a program of mandatory evaluation by a trained professional for Players who are suspected of an alcohol use problem (including Players who are arrested for DWI or other crimes involving alcohol), and for players who are arrested for crimes involving the use of force or violence.

No fines or suspensions or anything yet, but as we talked about when all of those dudes were getting arrested on suspicion of DUI this past year, it’s not as easy to do that as you might think. Ask Derek Lowe, who was arrested, tarred, feathered and … then had all charges dropped against him.

Next up: maple bats:

The parties agreed that no new players will be permitted to use a low density maple bat during the term of the agreement.

So, if you use one now, you’re cool. You’ve been grandfathered into things and you can impale someone completely within your rights as a union member.  New people, nope.  Finally, head safety:

By 2013, all Major League players will wear a new batting helmet developed by Rawlings that protects against pitches thrown at 100 miles per hour. The new version of the helmet is  significantly less “bulky” than prior versions of the more protective helmet.

We remember David Wright and Francisco Cervelli wearing these things. Glad to hear they’re less bulky, but really, if pink-painted pumpkin rinds were proved to protect against concussions, everyone should be on board with it.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”