Former Giants employee pleads guilty to embezzlement charges

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The shocker: the person accused of taking money they did not earn from the Giants wasn’t Miguel Tejada!

The San Francisco Giants’ former payroll manager pleaded guilty Monday to embezzling $2.2 million from the team. Robin M. O’Connor, 42, of American Canyon, pleaded guilty in San Francisco federal court to a single felony charge of wire fraud.

We first told you about this back in August when O’Connor was charged. I love the fact that what got get caught was a letter she forged telling the bank that the large deposits were extra payments from the team, grateful to her for her role in helping the team win the World Series. I mean, red flags are one thing, but creating your own red flag is pretty stupid. An over-explained fraud is a bad fraud.

That said, if taking extra playoff money from the Giants after contributing nothing to the World Series title was suspicious, I’m shocked Barry Zito hasn’t been questioned for anything yet.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”