More details on the rescue of Wilson Ramos

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Wilson Ramos was found safely by Venezuelan authorities on Friday, nearly 48 hours after he was taken from his home by four gunmen. Here are some more details on his rescue.

In an interview with Amanda Comak of the Washington Times, Ramos said he was lying in a bed in captivity when he began to hear an exchange of gunfire. He immediately jumped to the floor and prayed for his safety before being rescued by Venezuelan police commandos.

“They picked me up off the floor and they said, ‘Hey, Wilson, thank God, you’re safe. Let’s go home. Your family is waiting for you.’”

Ramos said his kidnappers only spoke to him briefly, saying that they were “going to ask for a ton of cash for me.” According to the family, they were never issued a demand for ransom and it’s believed they were not paid. The kidnappers did not hurt him and offered him food and water. While there are no physical scars, Ramos said, “psychologically I underwent very great harm.”

Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo issued a statement earlier this morning regarding Ramos’ rescue:

“I am happy to announce that I have spoken directly with Wilson and he assures me he is unharmed but eager to be reunited with his family,” Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo said in a statement. “He asked me to thank all who played a role in his rescue and all those who kept him and his family in their thoughts and prayers.

“I join Wilson in thanking the many law enforcement officials in Venezuela and investigators with Major League Baseball who worked tirelessly to ensure a positive ending to what has been a frightening ordeal. The only detail that concerns us is that Wilson is safe. The entire Washington Nationals family is thankful that Wilson Ramos is coming home.”

The Associated Press reports that five men were arrested in connection with the kidnapping, including a Colombian “linked to paramilitary groups and to kidnapping groups.”

According to Rafael Rojas of Viva Colorado, who has done a tremendous job on this story, Ramos hasn’t ruled out making another appearance in the Venezuelan Winter League in order to acknowledge the tremendous support he and his family received during his ordeal.

Felix Hernandez dealing with “dead arm”

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Mariners starter Felix Hernandez is dealing with “dead arm” and will head back to Seattle to have his shoulder examined, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Hernandez was reportedly visibly upset and left the clubhouse quickly, declining to speak to the media, Divish adds.

Hernandez wasn’t long for Tuesday’s game against the Tigers, as he lasted just two innings, yielding four runs on six hits and two walks with two strikeouts. The Mariners went on to lose 19-9. Hernandez is now carrying a 4.73 ERA over his first five starts.

Not much else can go wrong for the Mariners, who are now 8-13 in last place in the AL West. Mitch Haniger also suffered an oblique injury on Tuesday, joining what is becoming a lengthy list of dinged-up Mariners.

Video: Chris Coghlan dives home to beat the tag

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Blue Jays pinch-hitter Chris Coghlan found a creative way to beat the tag from Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina in the top of the seventh inning of Tuesday night’s game.

With the score tied 2-2, the Jays had a runner on first base and one out as Kevin Pillar faced reliever Matt Bowman. Pillar drove a 1-1 fastball to deep right field. Stephen Piscotty leaped in an attempt to make the catch, but the ball caromed off the wall and back towards the field. Coghlan, who was on first, made his way around third towards home. Piscotty threw home past the cutoff man and the ball reached Molina on several bounces. As Molina went low to apply the tag, Coghlan went high, leaping into the air and somersaulting into home plate to score the go-ahead run.

The Blue Jays would go on to score two in the inning, but the Cardinals answered with two of their own in the bottom half of the seventh. As of this writing, the score remains tied at four apiece.