Pete Rose

Pete Rose may be banned, but he advises A-Rod, Joey Votto and Jay Bruce


“Banned.”  You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means:

Rose regularly attends games each season in Cincinnati and Philadelphia, two of the places where he played during his 23-year career, and is often introduced to players. “Then they end up texting me all the time,” Rose said. “I have play-hard credentials. No b———t, no non-sense credentials and I think players respect that. That’s why young players like me today.”… Rose said it’s not a matter of proper coaching not being available for today’s players, but rather an issue with their self-esteem … “The better the player, the less confidence they seem to have.”

Included in his list of advisees is Alex Rodriguez, Joey Votto and Jay Bruce. And my gratuitous use of the Inigo Montoya quote notwithstanding, sure, there’s nothing in Rose’s ban that keeps him from talking on the phone to people. Baseball can keep him out of the Hall of Fame and off a Major League payroll, but they can’t keep him from having friends who happen to be ballplayers.

Freakin’ Rose. He makes me so mad. I think he actually has a point when he says in the article that players sometimes get overcoached and confused and stuff.  And while teams certainly want technically proficient coaches to help players do things the right way, I imagine there’s serious value to having a guy like Rose on every staff someplace who can just tell guys to go out there and hit the snot out of the ball and have the personal moxie and credibility to make that useful.

I just sometimes wonder what would have happened if Rose hadn’t been a complete train wreck and actually was allowed to have been around baseball all these years.  And he did things such that we never got a chance. Drives me nuts.

(via BTF)

Theo Epstein on sportswriters: “The life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself…”

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 07:  Chicago Cubs general manager Theo Epstein stands on the field during batting practice before the game between the Chicago Cubs and the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field on October 7, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Rick Morissey of the Chicago Sun-Times published an article on Sunday giving a bit of insight into Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein. When Epsten was younger, he dabbled in sportswriting, but quickly realized the trade wasn’t for him.

As Morissey details, when Epstein was 19 years old writing for Yale’s student newspaper, he wrote an article suggesting the school’s football coach should be fired during what would become a 3-7 season. Epstein was told during the meeting that one writer would defend the coach and one would call for his job. “It was a lesson in the way that the world of journalism sometimes works. It was an eye-opener for me. I regret it, and I’ve happily moved on.”

Epstein continued, “I realized I didn’t want to be a sportswriter when I was interning with the Orioles back in ’92, ’93, ’94. I did do a lot of media-relations stuff, and I saw that the life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself in the press box, go back to the hotel bar. Not to generalize.” He added, “But I really respect writing and respect sportswriters.”

He’s not wrong, and he seems to have found his calling as a front office executive. His Cubs are back in the World Series for the first time since 1945.

Jason Kipnis injured his ankle celebrating the pennant with Francisco Lindor

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Jose Ramirez #11, Francisco Lindor #12, Jason Kipnis #22 and Mike Napoli #26 of the Cleveland Indians celebrate after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays with a score of 4 to 2 in game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images
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Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis tweeted on Sunday, “Got a little too close to [Francisco Lindor] during the celebration!! Freak accident but should be good to go by Tuesday! #cantkeepmeoutofthisgame!”

Per’s Jordan Bastian, manager Terry Francona said Kipnis is dealing with a low ankle sprain, but he’s expected to be ready to go when the World Series begins on Tuesday. Kipnis went through fielding drills on Sunday.

Kipnis is hitting .167/.219/.367 with a pair of homers and four RBI in eight games this postseason.