Mike Quade to interview for the Twins Triple-A job

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The Peter Principle states that  “in a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence.” That means that employees tend to be promoted until they reach a position at which they cannot work competently. Most of us shoulda kept our last job, basically. You’ll see this in action if NBC ever decides to give me my own TV show.

Anyway, Mike Quade seems like a victim of that. He’s become a near-punchline for his rather feckless one year and change stint as Cubs manager, but that obscures the fact that he was a highly respected minor league manager and major league coach who should, if there is justice in the world, have no problem obtaining another high-level job in someone’s organization. Like, say, the Twins:

Former Cubs manager Mike Quade is one of a handful of candidates the Twins are interested in to manage their Class AAA affiliate in Rochester, N.Y … Other Rochester candidates include former Red Sox first base coach Ron Johnson, former Mets bench coach Ken Oberkfell, former Braves hitting coach Larry Parrish and former White Sox third base coach Jeff Cox.

Ambition is awesome, but let’s hear it for people finding places where they are both comfortable and can excel.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.