Prince Fielder

Rosenthal on the Rangers: Sign ALL THE FREE AGENTS

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There isn’t a lot happening in free agent land yet. As Olney notes today, a big reason for that is the pending Collective Bargaining Agreement, which is likely to alter free agent draft pick compensation pretty substantially, thereby changing the overall value/cost of a big name free agent.

Thank goodness for folks playing the “what if” game, then, because we need some sort of creativity around this sport until we complain about awards votes next week. Ken Rosenthal is playing it in his latest column, with specific reference to the Rangers:

The Rangers need to change the conversation … I’m talking about spring training, when the team will want to move past its crushing Series defeat. I’m talking about finding a new direction, a new energy, a newraison d’etre. I’m talking about doing something big — something so big, the players will regain their swagger and re-emerge as one of the favorites in the American League.

He thinks the Rangers should go after Prince Fielder. And Mark Buehrle. And one of the top closers like Heath Bell. He acknowledges that it would be crazy-expensive to do that sort of thing but thinks it’s worth it to shake things up.

I like the idea of Buehrle because I think the Rangers could use some rotation bolstering, but going after one of the big first baseman and a closer seems a bit much.  They still have the three-headed Napoli/Young/Moreland monster at first base to deal with. They have a fantastic bullpen already, its World Series shortcomings being a matter of fatigue, not lack of talent.

Mostly, though, I see a team that won its division by ten games. And which doesn’t look to be any worse next year. And whose competition isn’t likely to be any better.  And a team who, if Nelson Cruz didn’t feel the wall looming in Game 6, would have won the World Series.

The Rangers doesn’t seem like a candidate for a tone-change. Just some better luck and another crack at it next year.

Report: John Farrell won’t rule out a postseason return for Pablo Sandoval

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS - APRIL 11:  Pablo Sandoval #48 of the Boston Red Sox looks on from the dugout before the Red Sox home opener against the Baltimore Orioles at Fenway Park on April 11, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Orioles defeat the Red Sox 9-7.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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It’s been a strange season for Red Sox’ third baseman Pablo Sandoval, who lost his starting role in spring training, went 0-for-6 in three regular season appearances, and underwent season-ending surgery to repair a torn labrum in his left shoulder in May. That was the last the Red Sox were supposed to hear about Sandoval until spring 2017, when he was expected to rejoin the team after a lengthy rehab stint in Florida.

On Saturday, manager John Farrell was telling a different story. Per MLB.com’s Sam Blum, Farrell hinted that Sandoval could return to the team as soon as October, albeit in a very limited capacity.

At the time of the surgery, it was all looking at the start of next Spring Training,” Farrell said. “We’re not getting too far ahead of ourselves here, but at the same time, we compliment him for the work he’s put in, the way he’s responded to the rehab, the way he’s worked himself into better condition. We’re staying open-minded.

If the 30-year-old does return in 2016, don’t expect him to look like the three-home run hitter of the 2012 World Series. Should the Red Sox lose another player to injury, Sandoval might be called on as a backup option, but he’s unlikely to see substantial playing time under any other circumstances. Despite making two appearances at DH in the instructional league, Sandoval has not started at third base since undergoing surgery, though Farrell noted that a return to third base would be the next logical step in his recovery process.

Sandoval has yet to hit his stride within the Red Sox’ organization after hitting career-worst numbers in 2015. According to FanGraphs, his Offensive Runs Above Average (Off) plummeted to -20.2, contributing approximately two wins fewer than the average offensive player in 2015. (The Diamondbacks’ Chris Owings held the lowest Off mark in 2015, with -26.3 runs below average.) Sandoval has not appeared in a postseason race since the Giants’ championship run in 2014.

Heading into Saturday evening, the Red Sox could clinch their spot in the postseason with a win over the Rays and an Orioles’ loss.

Video: Adrian Beltre and Carlos Beltran give signs from the dugout

OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 23:  Adrian Beltre #29 of the Texas Rangers stands in the dugout before their game against the Oakland Athletics at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on September 23, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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The Rangers got a bit of a breather on Saturday after clinching the division lead during Friday night’s win. Naturally, it was also a prime opportunity for another of Adrian Beltre‘s well-documented antics, as he spent his off day directing the Rangers’ infield defense with a series of signs. Even with Carlos Beltran‘s help, no one, least of all those playing the infield, appeared to have any idea what Beltre’s gestures were intended to convey.

You can add this to the list of in-game oddities Beltre has become so well-known for over the years, running the gamut from the way he kicked a ball over the foul line to his histrionics every time someone comes close to touching his head. If nothing else, it’s a convincing audition reel for the third baseman’s future in major league coaching — a career path that, I’d imagine, would end up looking something like this: