Report: Wilson Ramos kidnapped from home in Venezuela

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From Rafael Rojas of Viva Colorado, a bilingual news source connected to the Denver Post, comes word that Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos has been kidnapped from his home in Valencia, Venezuela.

There aren’t many more details available at the moment and it might be hard to come by accurate information as this situation plays out, but we’ll pass along whatever we can find as soon as we find it.

Ramos batted .267/.334/.445 with 15 home runs and 52 RBI in 113 games this past season for the Nats. The talented 24-year-old was playing winter ball back in his native country for Tigres de Aragua BBC.

UPDATE, 8:17 PM: According to Venezuela’s El Nacional, Ramos was captured by four gunmen. The kidnappers have not yet contacted the Ramos family to seek a ransom for his release.

UPDATE, 8:37 PM: Venezula’s El Siglo says the kipnapping took place at 7:30 p.m. local time and that Ramos was with his family when captured. He was the only one taken away.

UPDATE, 10:22 PM: The president of Ramos’ Venezuelan team just spoke with the media from Ramos’ home: “Hopefully everything goes well. Prudence and moderation is important. In God’s name.”

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.