Of course Frank McCourt is going to try to complicate the Dodgers sale

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Nothing is easy with this guy.

Frank McCourt and Major League Baseball have a deal in which the team and the stadium and everything is to be sold and the TV rights — which aren’t up for renewal for two years — will be dealt with by the new owners, whoever they are.  The reason for the TV rights not being dealt with now is simple: Fox is going to sue the Dodgers back to the stone age if he tries to sell them now because Fox has exclusive negotiating rights for a future deal through next year.

So of course McCourt wants to try to sell TV rights before the team is sold:

Frank McCourt soon could ask the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to let him sell the Dodgers’ television rights along with the team, a strategy that could violate his sale agreement with Major League Baseball and revive his dormant litigation with Fox Sports.

“The Dodgers plan to file in the near future with the bankruptcy court an amended media rights procurement motion,” according to a club statement late Monday.

I don’t know. He’s defective somehow. It’s not enough to get out from under this mess and — if the sale is handled smoothly — maybe even walk away with a little pocket change.  He has to make trouble. I’m guessing the court or Fox or someone will tell him he can’t mess with the TV rights. He seems to not get anything until someone smacks him over the head with a 2×4.  Thank goodness there are plenty of 2x4s laying around.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”