89 percent of televisions in St. Louis tuned into Game 7

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St. Louis’ whole “best fans in baseball” thing can get a little tired. But there are times when the city truly backs it up. Like… well… last night.

Via MLB’s public relations department, 80 percent of the televisions in St. Louis were tuned into the FOX broadcast throughout Friday’s World Series Game 7, and 89 percent of the city’s screens were tuned in by the final out of the 6-2 victory.

St. Louis is different than other baseball-loving cities (like New York, Boston, Chicago or San Francisco) in that nearly all of its inhabitants were born or raised (or both) in the area. Because of industry, geography, and other factors, it’s not a place that attracts a ton of permanent out-of-towners.

Almost everyone grows up watching the Cardinals, with a decent-to-extensive understanding of the club’s history and the current roster makeup. Of course they were watching. But that 89 percent mark is still quite amazing, and a reflection of how baseball-crazy the Gateway City really can be.

Friday’s Game 7 drew a total of 25.4 million viewers around the country, making it the most-watched baseball game since the Red Sox ended their 86-year championship drought in St. Louis back in 2004.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.