Potential candidates to replace Bud Selig

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The other day I noted that there was no clear successor to Bud Selig when he steps down at the end of 2012.  From my lips to Maury Brown’s keyboard, for today he runs down some of the possibilities over at The Biz of Baseball.

None of the candidates Maury mentions are bad. Sandy Alderson and Stan Kasten are smart guys and smart is good. Rob Manfred has been in the trenches and that works. While the idea of Andy MacPhail troubles me a bit inasmuch as no one would probably be talking too seriously about him if he didn’t come from a family line of executives, he has been in the sorts of jobs that would give him experience here. A legacy-saved, let’s call him.

Ultimately, though, brains aren’t going to trump everything. Or even be the most important thing. Not saying Selig isn’t smart — he is — but his biggest skill is in consensus building among the ownership group. It’s what allows him to basically do anything he wants. Making the owners mad is what causes coups. Coups like the one that brought Selig into power in the first place.

Which makes me wonder if another current owner isn’t the most likely replacement. Someone who saw that Selig moved on from the Brewers, made a tidy profit on his team and then made a healthy freakin’ salary for nearly 20 years on top of it, all the while transforming his legacy from used car salesman to one of the preeminent sports executives of all time.

Whatever happens, it will be fun to watch.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.