La Russa’s Game 5: Age? Medication? Exhaustion? Or does stuff just happen?

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Bernie Miklasz of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch has a provocative column today, trying to drill down into why, exactly, things got out of Tony La Russa’s control in Game 5.  It goes in a direction that I’ve not seen anyone take — and I predict that Bernie will catch some serious hell from some quarters for even raising the issue — but he asks whether La Russa is burnt out or, alternatively, whether his medical treatment for shingles has caused him to lose an edge.

Please read the column before you spout off. It’s measured and reasoned and ultimately Bernie is, I think, correct in saying that it’s silly to make any definitive judgment about anything based on a couple of mistakes in a single game. Miklasz himself calls the notion that La Russa is done or close to it “ridiculous.” I agree.

But they are questions that, even if they’re not germane to La Russa at this particular time are germane to any person in a stressful job as they get older. Every general, public official, coach, teacher, executive, factory worker and every other person in a position of power, influence and responsibility reaches a point where it’s not as easy to do what used to come so easily. If it’s burnout it could come at age 30, not 70. If it’s exhaustion it could come and then go with some rest.  If it’s age, well, there isn’t a hell of a lot we can do about that yet.

But it’s worth asking the question. Brave column, Bernie.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.