Chris Carpenter seems to have forgotten one of those unwritten rules he cares so much about

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Last night, after giving up a homer to Adrian Beltre, Chris Carpenter retired Mike Napoli on a long fly out to end the sixth inning.  After the fly ball, Carpenter appeared to yell multiple expletives at Napoli. Expletives that begin with the letter F and which seem to say “Good sir, you may have thought you were going to do something productive there, but you did not. Thus (a) you should go have intercourse with yourself; and (b) you are a portion of excrement.”

Or maybe he didn’t. Maybe he was just yelling “Motte” but everyone misheard him.  Either way, Big Legaue Stew has video of it with someone filling in the words that seem to fit Carpenter’s words, but be VERY forewarned: it’s loud and profane. It’s funny too, but that’s beside the point.

All of which makes me wonder about Chris Carpenter. About how he justifies his own behavior in light of the fact that he once famously called out a player for yelling at himself. That took place in 2010 when Carlos Lee popped out in a key situation and, angry at his failure, appeared to chastise himself for it.  The theory behind Carpenter’s anger at that: you don’t disrespect the pitcher by implying that the failure was your own as opposed to you being dominated by said pitcher. Yeah, I know, that sounds crazy, but at the time, Carpenter’s manager Tony La Russa said that Carpenter was totally in the right:

Pence hits the ball out of the ballpark. Carp didn’t make a good pitch. Carp doesn’t say a word. He doesn’t say anything to the guy that hit it. It’s his mistake. Well, routinely now, hitters pop up a pitch they think they should deal with and they start making noises, and that really is disrespectful to the pitcher. Most of the pitchers just turn around and ignore it. Carp doesn’t. I think Carp’s right, and I think Carp’s in the right. Respect should go both ways.

“If he gets you out, he gets you out. Zip it and go back to the plate. If he gives it up, you zip it and let the guy go around the bases–or single, double, whatever it was. Most pitchers let the guy
jabber. I don’t think Carlos Lee is anything special as far as a guy who disrespects, but it’s so common now. Carp will let you know.”

Respect should go both ways. Hitters should shut up no matter what, even if they’re not talking to the pitcher at all, but the pitcher can call the hitter a “piece of sh**” and give him the old “eff you” when he pops up.

Man, I’m glad we have Chris Carpenter around to keep us straight on all of these unwritten rules. They’re so complicated!

Umpire ejects Adrian Beltre for moving on-deck circle

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As far as ejections go, this is one of the stranger ones you’ll hear about. Rangers third baseman Adrian Beltre was ejected in the bottom of the eighth inning of a game his team trailed at the time 18-6. Beltre was a few feet away from the circle towards home plate and was asked by Marlins pitcher Drew Steckenrider to get into the circle. So rather than step a few feet back to his right, Beltre picked up the circle and dragged it to where he was. And that got him ejected by second base umpire Gerry Davis. Manager Jeff Banister was also ejected after having a word with Davis.

Here’s a video from Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports:

Beltre, by the way, went 3-for-3 with a walk, a pair of doubles, and a solo home run. He’s now four hits away from 3,000 for his career.

Video: Phillies prospect J.P. Crawford hits an inside-the-park grand slam

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Phillies shortstop prospect J.P. Crawford’s stock has fallen sharply this season. He had an abysmal first three months, batting .203/.321/.276 in 291 plate appearances. Baseball America rated him the 12th overall prospect in baseball going into the season and rated him No. 92 in their midseason top 100. It was bad.

Since the calendar turned to July, however, Crawford has been more like his normal self. In 92 at-bats this month entering Wednesday night’s action, he was hitting .300/.391/.650 with six home runs, 13 RBI, 18 runs scored, and a terrific 15/12 K/BB ratio.

Crawford padded his stats more on Wednesday night as he circled the bases for an inside-the-park grand slam. Via the IronPigs Twitter:

Crawford was actually dead-to-rights at home, but he fooled the catcher with a great late slide.

Crawford finished 1-for-3 with a walk along with the slam on the night as the IronPigs beat the Gwinnett Braves 8-2.