Jamie Moyer still planning on making comeback in 2012

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Jamie Moyer still has his eyes on the prize.

According to Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com, the veteran left-hander is continuing to make steady progress in his ongoing recovery from Tommy John elbow surgery and remains focused on returning to the major leagues for the 2012 season.

Moyer, who turns 49 years old in November, plans to begin contacting big league clubs within the next couple of weeks to gauge interest. He’s unlikely to find any kind of guaranteed deal, but a number of teams should be open to inviting him to spring camp.

“There will be naysayers, but they’ve been there my whole career,” Moyer said last week. “I don’t let them affect me in a negative way. If anything, I turn it into a positive. If this were the middle of July, I’d be at the stage where one more good bullpen session and I’d be ready to go out on a [minor-league] rehab assignment. I’ve gone through this rehab knowing that my arm and body will stop me if they have to. So far they haven’t.”

The 24-year major league veteran posted a 4.84 ERA and 1.10 WHIP over 111 2/3 innings in 2010. He sat out the entire 2011 season, but he’s fully expecting to be back to 100 percent health by next February.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.