Padres will receive compensation from Cubs for losing Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod

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According to Scott Miller of CBSSports.com, the Padres will receive compensation if (or really, when) general manager Jed Hoyer and assistant general manager Jason McLeod leave to join the new-look Cubs’ front office.

Hoyer, who has served as GM for the past two seasons, is under contract with the Padres through 2013 with a club option for 2014. He is expected to receive a five-year contract with “a significant bump in pay from his current salary” to join his friend Theo Epstein in Chicago. Hoyer previously served as one of Epstein’s top assistants with the Red Sox while McLeod was director of amateur scouting.

Initial reports suggested that the Padres would not demand compensation, but Miller writes that they will likely receive one or two lower-level minor leaguers in return. The good news is that talks between the Cubs and Padres aren’t likely to be as complicated as the Epstein situation, as Dan Hayes of the North County Times notes that Chicago chairman Tom Ricketts and San Diego majority owner Jeff Moorad are close. Josh Byrnes, who is currently the Padres’ vice president of baseball operations, is expected to take over as GM once Hoyer and McLeod leave for Chicago.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.