One reason to wish the Yankees were still in the playoffs

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Like a lot of red-blooded Americans, I’m happy the Yankees got beat in the first round. Viva variety and all of that. Let Fox and TBS fixate on some other teams for a change.

But a side effect of that is that a bunch of New York reporters now have nothing to do except to come up with silly trade and free agent ideas, and I’m just not ready for that kind of thing until at least mid-November.

The latest: John Harper of the Daily News playing the “it would never happen but what if the Yankees signed Prince Fielder” game:

Or would the Yankees be better off paying huge money for Fielder, whose lefthanded swing just might produce 50 home runs a year with the help of Yankee Stadium, and using Jesus Montero to trade for pitching? I know, I know, I advocated for keeping Montero in my look-ahead column a few days ago, and I do think the Yankees should find out what he can do for them. But the point is, you can’t rule out the possibility that Fielder could wind up a Yankee, slotting in between Robinson Cano and Alex Rodriguez as a full-time DH.

I suppose anyone could end up a Yankee.  I just don’t see Bud Selig hammering through a rule change that would allow that team to have multiple first basemen and designated hitters play every game for the next six or seven years.

Oh well. Hot stove season is coming. It’s never too early to start girding yourself against the loony stuff we’re going to encounter over the winter.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 13 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.

Report: Charlie Sheen has original cast on board for Major League III, looking for financial backing

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TMZ is reporting that actor Charlie Sheen has the original cast on board for Major League III but is still looking for financial backing. TMZ cites Sheen referring to the script as “dynamite.”

The original Major League came out in 1989 and debuted at No. 1 at the box office. That spurred a sequel, Major League II, which was released five years later in 1994. Despite negative reviews, II debuted at No. 1 at the box office as well. Major League: Back to the Minors was released in 1998, but tanked at the box office and received mostly negative reviews.

Given that trend, one might wonder why anyone would attempt Major League III, and one would be correct to raise that question. But it’s been 19 years since the last installment and 27 years since the original. People in their early 30’s and 40’s with nostalgia and disposable income will likely be willing to pay to relive a blast from the past. In my humble opinion, Major League is the finest of the baseball movies, so I’ll at least be curious if Sheen ends up getting financial backing.

Sheen has had, well, an interesting life in the last two decades so it’s no sure thing that people with money will trust him to stay out of trouble.