Delmon Young

Delmon Young: Detroit’s unlikely ALCS hero

2 Comments

If not for a Brennan Boesch thumb injury, Delmon Young may well have finished out the year as a soon-to-be non-tendered disappointment on an almost 100-loss Twins team.

And if not for a Magglio Ordonez injury, Young might still be sitting out the ALCS because of a strained oblique suffered last week against the Yankees.

But the stars aligned for Young, whether he deserved it or not, and he hit his fourth and fifth homers of the postseason in Thursday’s Game 5 win over the Rangers.

Young was much maligned in Minnesota and deservedly so. After his big breakthrough season in 2010, he spent the first 4 1/2 months of 2011 playing as if he didn’t much care, particularly not while stationed in left field. He hit just four homers and drove in 32 runs in 305 at-bats for the Twins. He cleared waivers in August, and the Tigers, needing an outfielder with Boesch hurt, took him off Minnesota’s hands for little in return.

Tigers manager Jim Leyland showed confidence in Young right away, installing him as the No. 3 hitter in front of Miguel Cabrera and Victor Martinez. He then homered in his very first at-bat for the team — against the Twins, no less — and he went on to hit seven more in 40 regular-season games.

Young faced a hurdle in the ALDS against the Yankees, injuring his oblique in Game 4 and sitting out Game 5. The Tigers disabled him for the ALCS in part for tactical reasons: they knew they could find a way to bring him back if they wanted to, whereas if he stayed on the roster and reinjured himself during the ALCS, he might have to be disabled for the World Series as well. Young went on to replace Ordonez on the roster after Game 1 against the Rangers. Still limited, he went 0-for-4 in Game 2, sat out Game 3 and then put together another 0-for in Game 4 prior to the Game 5 outburst. The second homer today even knocked in someone besides himself for the first time (he had four postseason RBI previously, all coming on solo shots).

The 26-year-old Young would seem to have a future in Detroit, regardless of what happens the rest of the month. He’ll probably make $6.5 million-$7 million next year in his final season of arbitration, or the Tigers could roll the dice and try signing him to a two- or three-year deal. It’d be a risky move with his often indifferent defense and his inconsistent offense, but he certainly possesses unrealized potential and now he someone who might be the key to unlocking it in Leyland.

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
4 Comments

With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
Eric Espada/Getty Images
2 Comments

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.