Theo Epstein

Theo Epstein in Chicago: Can he break a second curse?

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The first thing most people thought when the rumors of Theo Epstein possibly joining the Chicago Cubs began to circulate was “can he do it again?”  Can the man credited with ending baseball’s most famous world championship drought end baseball’s longest?  Now that Epstein and the Cubs have a deal, it’s worth taking a look at the challenge facing him in Chicago and asking ourselves if Theo Epstein can make lightning strike twice.

There are no guarantees in life, but there is reason to be optimistic about Epstein’s chances to turn the Cubs into a winner. Why? Because many of the same challenges he faced when he took over the Red Sox exist with the Cubs.

Epstein is very familiar with the overall milieu in which the Cubs currently find themselves. When he took over in Boston he inherited a franchise with a dispirited and fatalistic fan base and a team which called a near-dilapidated ballpark home.  He changed the mood soon after he arrived and helped change the narrative as ownership embarked on substantial ballpark renovations.  No, you can’t credit Theo Epstein with all of that — it was John Henry’s dollars which transformed Fenway Park from a place which had seen better years into a perpetually-sold out gem — but Epstein knows what faces the Cubs in this regard.

More substantively, at the top of the Cubs’ list of baseball-needs is fixing a farm system that, while recently spitting out a gem in Starlin Castro, seems to be much better at coming up with role players instead of future stars.  WEEI’s Alex Speier writes today about how back in 2003 Epstein made it his first mission to build a “scouting and player development machine.” While many of Epstein’s big-ticket free agent signings have been busts recently, he and his able assistants — many of whom went on to become general managers themselves — revamped the Red Sox’ player development apparatus.

Indeed, in his first three drafts, Epstein chose Jonathan Papelbon, Dustin Pedroia, Clay Buchholz and Jacoby Ellsbury. It may be hard to see player development as a strength of Epstein’s today given that he’s become more notable for high dollar free agent signings — and given that the young talent that he has acquired in recent years has been dealt to land players such as Adrian Gonzalez — but a steady stream of talent has been developed under Epstein’s watch and such an approach should be Epstein’s first task when he starts work this fall.

Finally there’s the matter of all of that expensive aging talent on the Cubs’ roster.  Yes, we are fixated on the Red Sox’ big bad contracts right now (e.g. John Lackey and Carl Crawford), but it doesn’t take too much effort to look back at what Epstein did in his early years in Boston to see that he’s the right man to fix the Cubs’ case of Chronic Bad and Expensive Syndrome.

Epstein cast off popular but aging and expensive stars like Pedro Martinez and Nomar Garciaparra. He got rid of Manny Ramirez despite his still-elite production when his antics became too much to bear. He made what we forget now were bargain moves like snagging David Ortiz and locking up young stars like Pedroia, Jon Lester and Kevin Youkilis to long-term contracts before they got expensive in arbitration.  He stuck with the then-young and rising Lester and declined to include him in a package for what was thought to be a sure-fire ace in Johan Santana.

Now transfer those examples to the Cubs.  Is there any doubt with that track record that Epstein will be able to figure out that the next winning Cubs team will not have guys like Alfonso Soriano and Carlos Zambrano playing critical roles? Is there any doubt that he’ll be able to ensure that Starlin Castro gets locked up and becomes the centerpiece of the club going forward? That he won’t make shortsighted moves to trade for veterans who, while well-known, aren’t suited for where the team currently finds itself on the success cycle?

Like I said above: there are no guarantees.  If the last month of baseball has shown us, predicting baseball is a sucker’s game.  Epstein may flop in Chicago and the title drought may go to 200 years before it ends.  But as one looks around the game, one would be hard-pressed to find a person more familiar with the challenges facing the Chicago Cubs and with a more successful track record at addressing those exact challenges than Theo Epstein.

It’s a great hire. And one that should give Cubs fans real hope for the first time in a long time.

Marc Rzepczynski signs two-year, $11 million contract with Mariners

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 9: Marc Rzepczynski #23 of the Washington Nationals looks on before pitching against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the sixth inning during game two of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 9, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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After rumors of the deal surfaced on Thursday, the Mariners officially signed veteran reliever Marc Rzepczynski to a two-year, $11 million deal on Friday night. Per a report by ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick, the lefty is due $5.5 million in 2017 and 2018.

The signing marks the left-hander’s fourth trade since July 2015. He bounced from the Indians to the Padres at the 2015 trade deadline, then to the Athletics in the offseason, then to the Nationals in late August of 2016. Last season, he pitched to a career-best 2.64 ERA during 47 2/3 innings with the Athletics and Nationals, but hit an all-time low with 5.5 BB/9 that fed into a 1.59 K/BB rate. While the 31-year-old’s split against right-handed batters are underwhelming (a career .277/.377/.431 line with 123 walks and 24 home runs), he’s held lefties to a respectable .222/.291/.298 line with just 52 walks and eight homers.

Adding Rzepczynski to the bullpen should check off another to-do item for Mariners’ GM Jerry Dipoto, though FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman notes that the club is still likely to pursue an additional reliever and a No. 4 starter before the offseason comes to a close.

2016 Winter Meetings Preview

NATIONAL HARBOR, MD - FEBRUARY 26: The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center is seen along the Potomac River February 26, 2014 in National Harbor, Maryland.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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The baseball world will descend on Washington D.C. — well, the Maryland suburbs of Washington, at the Gaylord Resort at National Harbor — this weekend for the 2016 Winter Meetings. There’s a lot of work to be done.

Twenty free agents from a class of 191 have signed thus far. Among the notable: Yoenis Cespedes, Edinson Volquez, Neil Walker, Josh Reddick, Bartolo Colon, and R.A. Dickey. That, of course, leaves a ton of notables left, including Edwin Encarnacion, Justin Turner, Jose Bautista, Aroldis Chapman, Kenley Jansen, Mark Trumbo, Mark Melancon, Rich Hill and a host of others. Here is our rundown of this offseason’s top free agents if you’re curious. As you have come to expect from us, we’ll have a writeup of everyone who signs, faster than almost anyone else will.

Despite the sheer number of available free agents, this is an historically thin free agent class in terms of talent. That means that, for a team to improve significantly, they may be better served by making a trade. We’ve seen a couple already, most notably the deals which sent Taijuan Walker to the Diamondbacks, Jaime Garcia to the Braves and Brian McCann to the Astros. Most experts believe there will be plenty more this winter, and the ball could really get rolling on that in the next week with guys like Andrew McCutchen, Chris Sale, Chris Archer, Jay Bruce, Curtis Granderson and Brandon Phillips on the block.

Another major activity of the Winter Meetings is the Hall of Fame Veterans Committee vote. Except, this year, there is no Veterans Committee, at least in name. It’s now the “Today’s Game” committee. Here are links to breakdowns of the candidacies of all ten men on the ballot the new committee will consider:

Harold Baines
Albert Belle
Will Clark
Orel Hershiser
Mark McGwire
George Steinbrenner
Davey Johnson
Lou Piniella
John Shuerholz
Bud Selig

Trade deals, free agent negotiations and Hall of Fame votes take place behind closed doors at the Gaylord Resort. One of the major public activities of the Winter Meetings is when all 30 of the managers meet and greet the press. This year’s new faces are Torey Lovullo with the Diamondbacks, Rick Renteria with the White Sox and Bud Black with the Rockies. Brian Snitker, now the permanent manager of the Braves, will get his first go-around at the managerial cattle call. I’ll be in the scrum for a lot of these guys — they do them two at a time so I can’t see everyone — and will let you know if they say anything fun.

Outside of the transactions and the Hall of Fame stuff, we have the more mundane Winter Meetings business. And a lot of it. Indeed, the vast majority of the people at the Meetings aren’t there for transactions. They’re there to network, seek jobs and discuss the business of baseball like any other industry convention. Ever year we hear about a rule change or a proposal for future rule changes at the Meetings, though this year’s brand new Collective Bargaining Agreement should overshadow that. We’ve already discussed the major points of that and, yesterday, I speculated that, as time goes on, the way this agreement was reached could lead to some serious strife going forward, particularly on the union side. Expect to hear some anonymous rumblings about all of that in the next few days, from players, agents and other interested parties who may not be all that pleased with how it goes.

The final event of the Winter Meetings is the Rule 5 Draft, which will take place at 8am on Thursday morning. You likely have no idea who most of the players who will be selected are, but here’s a good place to start your research on that. If your team takes someone in the draft, the most important thing to know is that he’ll either be on the big league roster all year or he’ll have to be returned to his original team. Well, they could be stashed on the disabled list with phantom injuries so they won’t have to be returned, but no team would ever do that, would they? Perish the thought.

So, yes, there’s a lot to be done. I’ll be on the scene at National Harbor, bringing you all the best hot stove business we have to offer and, as usual, some more fun odds and ends from baseball’s biggest offseason event. As they used to say in radio, tune in to us and rip off the dial. Or, at the very least, keep a tab open to us and refresh a lot.