The Yankees’ problem? Lack of “killer instinct”

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That’s Bob Klapisch’s view in his column this morning anyway. A-Rod and the Yankees couldn’t get a key hit against Joaquin Benoit or Max Scherzer last Thursday because, well, they just couldn’t will it to be so:

The past-era Yankees had a ferocious trait that couldn’t be quantified. It was an intangible expectation of victory – even if that very term now is politically incorrect among baseball’s intelligentsia. Girardi, who was part of the championship run from 1996-2000, is so brainwashed he suggested those four rings were influenced, in part, by luck. Try running that by Tino Martinez, Paul O’Neill and David Cone.

But that’s how the present-day Yankee family is making peace with their collapse against the Tigers – it was the wrong time, the wrong set of circumstances, just the wrong karma.

He blames the 2011 Yankees’ failure to make it out of the first round on “a killer instinct that never was honed.”

Just once — once! — I’d like to see someone identify a killer instinct before the end of a team’s season rather than after it.  Because until that happens I’m going to believe something very shocking: that stuff like this is all ex-post-facto narrative building, not baseball analysis that is useful in the slightest.

Not that anyone would ever cop to that.  Because to do so leaves us in this world, and that would make everyone who claims to be an expert about such matters feel less important and wise.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.