Bryan Fischer

Hate monger says baseball’s post-9/11 use of “God Bless America” saved us from terrorist attacks

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I’m not a big fan of the singing of “God Bless America” during the seventh inning stretch at baseball games.  Yes, I know why it started and it was a sweet and even beautiful thing for a short time after 9/11. But it soon ran its course and became yet another exercise in empty patriotism. Now it just crowds out “Take me out to the ballgame,” ices the road team pitcher and more or less intrudes upon the vibe of a perfectly good ballgame.

I realize not everyone agrees with those criticisms, but even if you don’t, how about trashing “God Bless America” on the grounds that a hate-mongering nutjob believes that that song being sung in ballparks caused God Himself to spare the United States from further terrorist attacks post-9/11?

The hate-monger is Bryan Fischer of the Christian group the American Family Association. Being a Christian is not what makes him a hate-monger, of course. Being a man who routinely accuses Muslims, Native Americans, African Americans, gays and Hispanics of causing the world’s ills is what makes him a hate-monger. Seriously, Google this guy.  Even run-of-the-mill bigots look at him and go “damn!”

Anyway, he has a theory. The video of it is below, but here’s a transcript. Note that he doesn’t say “terrorist attack.” He says “Muslim attack.”  Thinking that all Muslims are terrorists are one of Fischer’s many, many charms:

“By God’s blessing, we have not been hit by a Muslim attack since 9/11. I suggest that in part, we have Major League Baseball to thank. You remember that the week after 9/11 Major League Baseball converted the seventh inning stretch from the singing of ‘Take Me Out To The Ballgame’ to the singing of ‘God Bless America.’

“Now ‘God Bless America’ is not just a song, it is a prayer. When we sing that we are inviting God to bless America, to stand beside her and to guide her through the night with a light from above. So for one brief, shining moment every night, Major League Baseball has converted our stadiums into cathedrals in which tens of thousands of ordinary Americans lift their hearts and voices as one and ask God to watch over and protect the United States. Ladies and gentleman, I think that those prayers have been heard and they have been answered.”

If you want to believe that a little ditty that Irving Berlin wrote for a vaudeville revue called “Yip Yip Yaphank” — seriously — is truly a prayer, hey, I’m not going to stop you.  But I’m going to go on record as saying that if Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association said that the sky was blue I’d fight to the death for the proposition that it was red.  Enjoy the video:

BBWAA votes to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning next year

Cooperstown
Associated Press
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In addition to naming the Spink Award winner this morning, the Baseball Writers Association of America voted today to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with next year’s vote for the 2018 induction class.

As of now, writers are encouraged to make their votes public and, if they do, they are placed on the BBWAA website. They are not required to, however, and a great many Hall of Fame voters do not. While ballot secrecy is laudable in politics, the Hall of Fame vote brings with it a fundamentally different set of concerns and sentiment has increasingly favored transparency, as opposed to secrecy when it comes to the Hall of Fame.

While some in opposition to this move may claim that public ballots will only lead to criticism, our view is that if you can’t handle some reasonable criticism over your Hall of Fame ballot, you probably need to get out of the business of making history, which is what voting for the Hall of Fame really is.

The Yankee2 to retire Derek Jeter’2 number next 2ea2on

Derek Jeter
Getty Images
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RE2PECT: The Yankees just announced that they will retire Derek Jeter’s number 2 next season. The ceremony will take place on May 14, 2017 at Yankee Stadium.

With Jeter’s number 2 retired the Yankees will have retired 21 numbers. Twenty-two if you count number 8 twice, given that it was retired for both Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey. They also have retired 42 twice, once for Jackie Robinson, which every team has retired, and once for Mariano Rivera who donned 42 before the league-wide retirement of the number. The Yankees will also have put every single-digit number on the shelf. Except for zero, anyway, which no Yankees player has ever worn.

The retired pinstripes break down as follows:

1 Billy Martin
3 Babe Ruth
4 Lou Gehrig
5 Joe DiMaggio
6 Joe Torre
7 Mickey Mantle
8 Yogi Berra
8 Bill Dickey
9 Roger Maris
10 Phil Rizzuto
15 Thurman Munson
16 Whitey Ford
20 Jorge Posada
23 Don Mattingly
32 Elston Howard
37 Casey Stengel
42 Mariano Rivera
44 Reggie Jackson
46 Andy Pettitte
49 Ron Guidry
51 Bernie Williams