Johnny Damon and B.J. Upton want to stay with Rays in 2012

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Matthew Pouliot wrote yesterday about how the Rays are in position to potentially bring back nearly their entire roster next season, with the notable exception of Johnny Damon being one of their few free agents and B.J. Upton possibly being on the trading block.

Following yesterday’s season-ending loss Damon and Upton both expressed a desire to remain with the Rays in 2012. Damon called Tampa Bay “the perfect fit” and told Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times that he “would love to come back.”

Upton was slightly less optimistic with one season remaining until he’s eligible for free agency, saying:

I’m hoping I’m back. That’s out of my hands, I’ve got nothing to do with that. But I’ve grown up with a lot of these guys, and the guys we’ve acquired, I enjoy being around them. So hopefully next February I’m still in a Rays uniform.

There were plenty of rumors swirling around Upton in July, so he figures to be linked to numerous teams this offseason. He’s in line for about $7 million via the arbitration process and the Rays have Desmond Jennings ready as a center field replacement. If the Rays liked having Damon around and he’s willing to take another moderately priced one-year contract he could fit into their 2012 plans, but the Upton situation is more complicated.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.