Johnny Damon and B.J. Upton want to stay with Rays in 2012

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Matthew Pouliot wrote yesterday about how the Rays are in position to potentially bring back nearly their entire roster next season, with the notable exception of Johnny Damon being one of their few free agents and B.J. Upton possibly being on the trading block.

Following yesterday’s season-ending loss Damon and Upton both expressed a desire to remain with the Rays in 2012. Damon called Tampa Bay “the perfect fit” and told Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times that he “would love to come back.”

Upton was slightly less optimistic with one season remaining until he’s eligible for free agency, saying:

I’m hoping I’m back. That’s out of my hands, I’ve got nothing to do with that. But I’ve grown up with a lot of these guys, and the guys we’ve acquired, I enjoy being around them. So hopefully next February I’m still in a Rays uniform.

There were plenty of rumors swirling around Upton in July, so he figures to be linked to numerous teams this offseason. He’s in line for about $7 million via the arbitration process and the Rays have Desmond Jennings ready as a center field replacement. If the Rays liked having Damon around and he’s willing to take another moderately priced one-year contract he could fit into their 2012 plans, but the Upton situation is more complicated.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.