Diamondbacks stave off elimination with 8-1 victory

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The Diamondbacks jumped all over Brewers starter Shaun Marcum and won 8-1 Tuesday to extend the NLDS to a Game 4.

Pitching with Arizona down 2-0 in the series, Josh Collmenter shut down the Brewers for the third time this year. He pitched 14 scoreless innings against Milwaukee during the regular season, and he allowed just one run and two hits in seven innings tonight.

Arizona’s offense, which was limited to five runs in the first two games, got on the board right away, scoring two runs on hits from Miguel Montero and Paul Goldschmidt in the first. Montero added another RBI in the third, and Goldschmidt delivered the big blast of the night, knocking Marcum out of the game with a grand slam in the fifth.

It was Goldschmidt’s second homer in two games after he sat in favor of Lyle Overbay in the opener.

Game 4 of the NLDS will be played Wednesday in Arizona, with lefties Randy Wolf and Joe Saunders scheduled to start. Wolf lost both of his starts against the Diamondbacks this season, amassing a 6.08 ERA in the process. Saunders allowed two runs over seven innings in a no-decision in his lone start versus the Brewers.

Notes

– Rickie Weeks shielded Willie Bloomquist from second base on a first-inning steal attempt, but didn’t get the call from umpire Jeff Kellogg. It proved crucial, as the Diamondbacks went on to score two runs with two outs in the frame.

– Goldschmidt’s slam was the third by a rookie in postseason history. The previous two were hit by Yankees: Gil McDougald in the 1951 World Series and Ricky Ledee in the 1999 ALCS.

– Regardless of how many more games the Diamondbacks play this year, it should be a lock now that Goldschmidt won’t be on the bench in any of them. He’s hit 10 homers in 164 at-bats between the regular season and the playoffs, and he’s driven in six of Arizona’s 13 runs in the series.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.