Don’t expect Phillies to use any starters on short rest

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Chris Carpenter’s first career short-rest start didn’t go well Sunday in Philadelphia and when asked if he’d ever use a Phillies starter on short rest during the playoffs pitching coach Rich Dubee made it pretty clear that he’s against the idea:

Most real good players at this level get accustomed to a routine. Apparently that was Carpenter’s first whack at it. That’s a strange beast right there. You’re going from your normal side day. Then you’re third day generally you can kick back and relax mentally. The fourth day you get ready to pitch. Now all of a sudden you probably didn’t have a side day and you have shorter rest and shorter preparation time.

That’s about as close to criticizing the opposing manager as someone can come without making headlines and creating bulletin board material. And in terms of potential Tony La Russa nicknames I think “strange beast” is a pretty decent one, accidentally.

Of course, in fairness to La Russa there’s a whole lot less need to use a starter on short rest when you’re pitching coach for a team that has four No. 1 starters. Philadelphia’s rotation is so deep that Roy Oswalt is basically just a spot starter and Vance Worley is in the bullpen, so pushing Roy Halladay or Cliff Lee to pitch on three days rest isn’t really necessary even if Dubee agreed with the strategy.

With that said, Todd Zolecki of MLB.com notes that Dubee has also been true to his word in past seasons when the Phillies weren’t quite as stacked with aces, resisting the urge to use go short rest with Cole Hamels in the 2007 NLDS, Cliff Lee in the 2009 World Series, and Roy Halladay in last year’s playoffs. Things might be different if the choice was between, say, Halladay on short rest or Joe Blanton, but Ruben Amaro Jr. has made sure Dubee and manager Charlie Manuel never have to make that type of call.

Report: Yankees to promote Gleyber Torres

Yankees Torres Baseball
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Yankees top prospect Gleyber Torres will be promoted to the majors this weekend, per a report from Jack Curry of the YES Network. Torres was expected to make his debut earlier in the season, but his starting date was pushed back after he suffered a bout of back tightness last Monday. Now, however, it looks like he’s finally healthy enough to make an impact on a team that’s in sore need of an offensive boost. As of Saturday evening, the team has yet to officially confirm the move.

The 21-year-old infielder has made quite the impression in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre this spring, slashing .370/.415/.543 with five extra-base hits and 11 RBI in his first 53 plate appearances. Prior to the start of the 2018 season, he was ranked first overall in the Yankees’ system and fifth among the league’s best prospects (via MLB Pipeline). His numbers at the plate have been made all the more impressive by the fact that he’s only 10 months removed from Tommy John surgery on his non-throwing arm; neither the injury nor the lengthy recovery process seems to have had any detrimental effect on his game play this year.

While Torres appears most comfortable as a shortstop, he’s not expected to supplant Didi Gregorius in a starting role. Instead, it’s more likely that he’ll sub in at second and third base among the likes of Miguel Andujar, Neil Walker and Ronald Torreyes.