Three days rest: Carpenter, Spahn, Maddux, and … Loaiza?

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For the first time in his 14-season, 339-start career Chris Carpenter started on short rest last night and it didn’t go well, as he failed to make it out of the fourth inning while allowing four runs to put the Cardinals in an early hole.

St. Louis came back to win, so rightly or wrongly few people are questioning Tony La Russa’s decision today. But mostly Carpenter making his first short-rest start at age 36 got me wondering about short-rest starters throughout baseball history.

Details from the early 1900s are often incomplete, but based on the data Baseball-Reference.com has available here are the all-time leaders in starts made on three days rest:

Warren Spahn      282
Jim Kaat          282
Gaylord Perry     280
Jim Palmer        257
Phil Niekro       255
Don Drysdale      253
Mickey Lolich     251
Jim Bunning       241
Fergie Jenkins    226
Robin Roberts     219

Warren Spahn debuted in 1942 and you’ll notice that most of those other pitchers are from the 1960s and 1970s, when four-man rotations made starts on three days rest commonplace. But how about more recently? Here’s the same list, but from 1990 forward:

Greg Maddux        30
Mike Moore         24
Scott Erickson     24
Tom Glavine        23
John Burkett       21
John Smoltz        20
Terry Mulholland   20
Tim Wakefield      19
Esteban Loaiza     19
Chuck Finley       19

Of the 10 pitchers to make 19 or more starts on three days rest since 1990, three of them were in the Braves’ rotation for most of the 1990s. And the leader since 2000? Esteban Loaiza, with 10. Obviously.

It also should be noted that knuckleballer Wilbur Wood not only made 153 starts on three days rest in the 1960s and 1970s, he also made 71 starts on two days rest. And in those 71 starts he had a 2.67 ERA.

Report: Twins sign Erick Aybar to minor-league deal

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The Twins have reportedly signed free agent shortstop Erick Aybar to a minor-league deal, LaVelle E. Neal III of the Star Tribune reported Friday. FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman adds that the deal comes with a potential $1.25 million if Aybar reaches the majors, with additional incentives based on plate appearances. He’ll be able to opt out on March 27. The team has yet to confirm the signing.

Aybar, 34, is now four years removed from his career year in 2014. He’s been in a state of steady decline since then, slashing just .234/.300/.348 with seven home runs and 11 stolen bases over 370 plate appearances for the Padres in 2017. His poor performance wasn’t helped by a fractured left foot, either, which cost him almost six weeks on the disabled list.

Still, the Twins see something promising in the veteran infielder, and reportedly intend to use him as another utility option this spring. Per Neal, Aybar will join fellow backup infielders Eduardo Escobar and Ehire Adrianza and may even (temporarily) take over for Miguel Sano at third base if Sano isn’t able to shape up for the role by Opening Day.