Kevin Youkilis is less-than-clear on whether there was beer in the Red Sox clubhouse

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Last week there was considerable to-do over a report that the Red Sox drank beer in the clubhouse on their off-days.  Kind of a silly to-do as far as I’m concerned because, hey, they’re grown men and there was no suggestion that there was any kind of alcohol abuse or anything like that.  If Sox pitchers cracked a couple of coldies while at the office, well, they wouldn’t be the first.

But the story seems to have legs insofar as it’s part of some general narrative people are discussing in the wake of Terry Francona’s departure about the Red Sox’ clubhouse chemistry, and questions about the beer continue to be asked.  Like I said, the questions seem kind of pointless to me, but the answers sure can be fun.  Here’s Kevin Youkilis’ answer in a story over at the Boston Globe:

The Red Sox third baseman wouldn’t say whether or not there was a beer-filled cooler in the locker room.

“I mean, that’s another thing too, that’s… I don’t know if that’s been out there, that’s in the media, what we have and what we don’t have,” Youkilis said. “I don’t know if I’m allowed to say if there is or there isn’t.”

That’s my boy! They’ll never break Youk! He’s not gonna flip on anyone, I tells ya!

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.