Good news, Braves fans: Derek Lowe made history this year

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Derek Lowe went 9-17 with a 5.05 ERA for the Braves this season and STATS LLC’s tidbit-filled Twitter feed notes that in doing so he became the first pitcher in baseball history to at one point in his career lead the league in wins, losses, and saves.

Lowe had an NL-leading 16 (yes, only 16) wins with the Dodgers in 2006, led the AL with 42 saves for the Red Sox in 2000, and paced the NL with 17 losses this year.

STATS LLC notes that John Smoltz previously led the league in wins and saves, and Jeff Russell previously led the league in losses and saves.

Lowe pitched so poorly that the Braves have all but said he won’t be in the rotation next year, which means they’ll try to dump the one year and $15 million remaining on his contract or shift the 38-year-old to the bullpen. Something tells me he won’t get a chance to lead the league in saves again, though.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.