Yovani Gallardo, Prince Fielder lead Brewers past Diamondbacks in Game 1 victory

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Yovani Gallardo ended the regular season as one of the hottest pitchers in baseball, allowing two runs or less in each of his last three starts while posting a ridiculous 36/3 K/BB ratio over 20 1/3 innings. He was equally brilliant this afternoon in Milwaukee, tossing eight innings of one-run ball in a 4-1 victory over the Diamondbacks in Game 1 of the NLDS.

Taking advantage of the shadows of the Miller Park roof, Gallardo allowed just four hits on the afternoon while striking out nine and walking just one. The only run scored on a solo home run by Ryan Roberts to lead off the top of the eighth inning. The 25-year-old right-hander finished strong, though, striking out the final three batters he faced. John Axford tossed a perfect top of the ninth for the save.

Ian Kennedy allowed four runs on eight hits over 6 2/3 innings in the loss. He also hit two batters. However, his line likely would have looked a lot better if it wasn’t for two curious decisions by Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson.

Gibson elected to pitch to catcher Jonathan Lucroy with two outs and a runner at third in the bottom of the sixth, despite the pitcher being on deck. Granted, Gallardo is actually a pretty decent hitter, but Lucroy delivered an RBI single to give the Brewers a 2-0 lead. Perhaps more egregious was pitching to Prince Fielder in the seventh with first base open following a two-out double by Ryan Braun. Fielder cashed in with a two-run blast over the right field fence, giving the Brewers some valuable insurance runs.

The Brewers will try to keep the pressure on tomorrow when they send Zack Greinke (16-6, 3.83 ERA) to the hill against Daniel Hudson (16-12, 3.49 ERA). Greinke will be pitching on short rest for the second straight start, but if Ron Roenicke’s crew can leave home with two victories, they should be in very good shape in this series.

Notes:

– I criticized Willie Bloomquist as the leadoff hitter in the live blog, but he had two of the Diamondbacks’ four hits on the afternoon. What do I know, anyway?

– Gallardo got off to a bit of a shaky start in the top of the first, but he was bailed out when Bloomquist was cut down at home plate on a throw by Ryan Braun.

– Lyle Overbay went 0-for-3 with a strikeout in the loss. I’m pretty sure we’ll see rookie Paul Goldschmidt at first base for Game 2 against Zack Greinke.

– Ryan Braun and Prince Fielder combined for five of the Brewers’ eight hits on the day.

– Gallardo’s nine strikeouts tied him with Don Sutton (1982) for the franchise record for strikeouts in a postseason game.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.