The Braves fire hitting coach Larry Parrish

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My official view of hitting coaches is that they really don’t make a hell of a lot of difference. Maybe they help a guy here or there, maybe they don’t, but I bet that if we studied the matter closely, we’d find a pretty strong correlation between successful hitting coaches and hitting coaches who happened to have good hitters under their instruction.

That said, hitting coaches are often lightning rods for criticism. Larry Parrish of the Braves has certainly been that.  For one thing, he replaced Terry Pendelton, who in addition to being popular, happened to preside over a Braves lineup that had the best OBP in the league last year. Why was he replaced? Because someone felt that new manager Fredi Gonzalez should be able to shape his staff his own way.  Clearly no one had heard of the “if it ain’t broke” rule.

This year the Braves were 5th worst in OBP in all of baseball.  A lot of that could be the talent level, as I noted above. Or it could be that Parrish’s approach — he preached aggressiveness at the plate — has made a mess of Braves hitters.  The upshot: Parrish’s impact is hard to quantify, but he certainly suggested stuff that — if it sunk in — was likely to have a bad effect. And the Braves’ hitting was, in fact, bad in 2011.

But maybe we should take something larger from all of this.  If Parrish was hired as a means of letting Fredi Gonzalez shape his staff, perhaps Gonzalez should feel insulted that his own man has been let go.  Perhaps he should be exceedingly indignant at being undermined in such a blatant and public fashion!

That cuts it. I see no other choice but for Fredi Gonzalez to resign in protest.  Protect your dignity, Fredi! It is the most important thing!

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.