Quote of the Day: Buster Olney and the MVP Award

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Here’s Buster Olney in his column today, in which he picked Ryan Braun and Justin Verlander as his MVP choices. First, on Braun:

For his work, and for his importance to the Brewers’ success, Braun should be the NL MVP; Matt Kemp had a spectacular season for the Dodgers, but Los Angeles — hampered by ownership issues and the team’s inability to spend on needed improvements last offseason — never contended this year.

Then on Verlander:

Some folks think that team success should have no bearing on the MVP Award, but the precedent has long been established: This award has historically been judged through the prism of the standings. To ignore that would be to ignore what the award was designed to be.

And here are the actual instructions printed on the MVP ballot:

It is up to the individual voter to decide who was the Most Valuable Player in each league to his team. The MVP need not come from a division winner or other playoff qualifier.

That first sentence means that Olney’s choice to go with Braun or Verlander on the basis of team strength is entirely acceptable.  That second sentence, however, makes it quite clear that team strength is no part of “what the award was designed to be.”  Nowhere on the ballot does it say that past MVP vote criteria are binding authority on future votes, blowing Olney’s notion of “precedent” out of the water. This is not the Anglo-American legal system. Stare Decisis is not in play here.  It’s baseball.

Buster can choose who he wants, and his two choices are entirely reasonable ones.  I just wish that voters who think like Buster does about such things owned up to the fact that it is their choice — their own subjective preference — to only vote for guys on winning teams and that no one is forcing them to do that.

Eric Thames hit two more homers

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And John Lackey is livid.

The Brewers’ first baseman homered in each of his first two plate appearances against Reds starter Amir Garrett on Monday evening, helping his team to a 6-1 lead after two frames. The first was a solo blast in the first inning, and the second was a two-run shot to the opposite field in the second inning.

According to MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy, Thames has tied the Brewers’ record for home runs in April with 10. Carlos Lee also hit 10 homers in April 2006.

Seven of Thames’ 10 home runs have come against the Reds. Including his first two at-bats on Monday night, Thames is hitting .379/.474/.924 with 17 RBI along with the 10 dingers. Not too shabby from a guy the Brewers signed to a three-year, $16 million contract during the offseason.

Lackey and Cubs pitching coach Chris Bosio both recently implied Thames is using performance-enhancing drugs, but Thames was tested immediately after last Monday’s game against the Cubs.

Giants promote top prospect Christian Arroyo

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Alex Pavlovic of NBC Sports Bay Area reports that the Giants have promoted top infield prospect Christian Arroyo from Triple-A Sacramento. MLB Pipeline rated Arroyo as the Giants’ No. 2 prospect behind pitcher Tyler Beede and the team’s best position player prospect.

Arroyo, 21, was selected in the first round (25th overall) of the 2013 draft. He started the year at Triple-A for the first time and he hit an astounding .446/.478/.692 with three home runs and 12 RBI in 69 plate appearances to start the season.

The Giants, 6-13, are looking to regain their balance after unexpectedly losing ace Madison Bumgarner, who sustained injuries riding a dirt bike on an off-day. Arroyo will likely play third base regularly over Eduardo Nunez.