What they’re saying about the collapses

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We had a taste of what was said about the Red Sox’ collapse last night, but there will be more commentary and reaction coming in all day today.  Come, let us bask in the failure:

  • Mark Bradley, Atlanta Journal-Constitution: “They failed. They failed in the way this entire month had been a failure. They took an 8 1/2-game lead and threw it all away, and by the time they got done losing Game No. 162 they had made us suffer through all the failures that comprised this failed month.”
  • Peter Abraham, Boston Globe: “There have been nights of anguish over the years for the men who have worn the uniform of the Boston Red Sox. But nothing quite like what transpired at Camden Yards last night.”
  • Scott Lauber, Boston Herald: “It had been a plodding, month-long march to baseball’s version of death — elimination from the playoff race — for the Red Sox. But the execution took only minutes”
  • Grant Brisbee, BaseballNation: It wouldn’t have been right to complete a monumental collapse with a garden-variety loss. There had to be some hope after the hope faded — a dead-cat bounce of hope … The Braves could have made the playoffs if they had won just one game out of their last five. They did not.
  • ESPN Boston: “The long, cold winter has begun.”
  • Chipper Jones: “When you’re in a slump as a team, you find a bunch of different ways to lose. The bats go silent, you get wild on the mound, you walk in runs – whatever. You find ways to lose. Man, we sure did it in the last couple of weeks.”
  • Fredi Gonzalez: “I’m proud of the club. We battled today.”

And that sums up everything you need to know about Fredi Gonzalez. He wasn’t paying attention to last night’s game. He wasn’t paying attention to much of anything, it seems.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.