The Dodgers-McCourt case may implicate the Marlins

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Good story over at the Los Angeles Times today illustrating just how gnarly things can get when litigation ensues, even if you think you have the clear high ground going in.

The upshot: Major League Baseball has been very sharp in its legal briefs thus far saying what we all know: Frank McCourt is undercapitalized and has used his team as a personal cash cow.  McCourt’s logical response: “I ain’t the only one.” And he’s likely to seek the financials from other teams to prove it.  Bill Shaikin notes that the Marlins may be particularly interesting given how clearly Jeff Loria was steered into the ownership chair of that team and how little of the Marlins’ revenue sharing money has been spent for baseball purposes.

In other McCourt news, there was apparently a hearing in the case this morning. It was mostly about schedules and boring stuff like that, but apparently McCourt’s lawyers argued that the Dodgers’ late season play — they’re going to finish over .500 — and the fact that Clayton Kershaw and Matt Kemp are leading candidates for postseason awards vindicates his management of the team and shows that it has not been harmed.

I don’t think that gets him very far — the business health of the team is every bit as important, if not more so, than the baseball health for the purposes of this proceeding — but I’m gonna be really mad if Kemp and Kershaw are even partially responsible for McCourt holding on to the Dodgers. They’re two of my favorite players right now, but I don’t think that can remain the case if that happens.

The Angels to lower the right field wall

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The Los Angeles Angels announced today that they will lower the right field wall at Angel Stadium from 18 feet to eight feet.

The stated reason: to make room for a new out-of-town scoreboard and “philosophical changes.” Obviously, though, helping out lefty power hitters is on the agenda too. As it was, Angel Stadium was in the bottom ten of all parks in allowing homers for lefties.

One of their own lefties is Kole Calhoun, who is a pull hitter. Another one could be Shohei Ohtani, who is a lefty hitter. Although, as a righty pitcher, that could harm him against opposing lefty batters. I’m assuming, though, that the Angels ran a bunch of numbers to establish that this move helps them more than it hurts them, or else they wouldn’t be doing it.