The Dodgers-McCourt case may implicate the Marlins

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Good story over at the Los Angeles Times today illustrating just how gnarly things can get when litigation ensues, even if you think you have the clear high ground going in.

The upshot: Major League Baseball has been very sharp in its legal briefs thus far saying what we all know: Frank McCourt is undercapitalized and has used his team as a personal cash cow.  McCourt’s logical response: “I ain’t the only one.” And he’s likely to seek the financials from other teams to prove it.  Bill Shaikin notes that the Marlins may be particularly interesting given how clearly Jeff Loria was steered into the ownership chair of that team and how little of the Marlins’ revenue sharing money has been spent for baseball purposes.

In other McCourt news, there was apparently a hearing in the case this morning. It was mostly about schedules and boring stuff like that, but apparently McCourt’s lawyers argued that the Dodgers’ late season play — they’re going to finish over .500 — and the fact that Clayton Kershaw and Matt Kemp are leading candidates for postseason awards vindicates his management of the team and shows that it has not been harmed.

I don’t think that gets him very far — the business health of the team is every bit as important, if not more so, than the baseball health for the purposes of this proceeding — but I’m gonna be really mad if Kemp and Kershaw are even partially responsible for McCourt holding on to the Dodgers. They’re two of my favorite players right now, but I don’t think that can remain the case if that happens.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.