Braves top Nationals, extend Wild Card lead to three games

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The Braves aren’t out of the woods yet, but they are inching closer to winning the NL Wild Card.

Behind a three-run first inning against Stephen Strasburg, the Braves topped the Nationals 7-4 last night. The Cardinals lost to the Cubs 5-1, so the Braves now lead the National League Wild Card by three games with five games remaining.

Tim Hudson allowed three runs over 5 2/3 innings in the last night’s victory. He left the game with cramping in his neck, but the issue is considered minor and he should be fine if the Braves need him to start the season finale next Wednesday against the Phillies. However, at this point, it doesn’t look like the season will go down to the final day.

Strasburg allowed three runs (two earned) on five hits over four innings while striking out three and walking none. His command was a little shaky, especially in the first inning, but he retired 10 out of the final 11 batters he faced. He now has a 2.00 ERA and 14/0 K/BB ratio over 18 innings since returning from Tommy John surgery.

Dan Uggla and Brian McCann both knocked in a pair of runs in the win while Michael Bourn swiped two bases, giving him a major-league best 58 stolen bases for the season. Bourn was also involved in a blown run-down play in the top of the ninth inning in which he was able to score from second base because nobody was covering home plate.

The Braves’ magic number for the Wild Card is down to three. They’ll send Brandon Beachy up against Chien-Ming Wang this afternoon. As for the Cardinals, they’ll have Kyle Lohse opposing Rodrigo Lopez.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.